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Breaking Down the Potential Japanese Team in Paris pt. 2

An update on standings for Japan's potential team at this summer's Paris Olympic Games. Final team nomination in most cases depends on a top 3 finish at the National Track and Field Championships, but as of this writing events where Japan could or will field three athletes having cleared the Olympic standard are the men's 110 mH, men's 400 mH, men's 20 kmRW and women's marathon. Other events that will or are likely to have a complete squad of three athletes include the men's 100 m, men's 200 m, men's 400 m, men's high jump, men's marathon, women's 5000 m, women's 10000 m, women's javelin throw, and women's 20 kmRW.

Main changes from last week:
  • Koki Ueyama moved up to 36th of 48 in the men's 200 m quota, passing Shota Iizuka for #2 Japanese man.
  • Yuta Sakiyama was 2nd in the men's javelin throw at the Josef Odlozil Memorial in Prague and broke into the Paris quota at 32nd of 32.
  • Misaki Morota was 2nd in the women's pole vault at the Royal City Inferno in Canada and also moved up to 32nd or 32.
  • Remi Tsuruta moved up 4 spots in the women's 200 m ranking to 53rd, now just 5 places out of the quota.
  • Shota Fukuda took 3rd in the men's hammer throw at the Taiwan Athletics Open, moving up from 40th to 38th, still out of the quota of 32 but closer.
  • Shingo Sawa inched marginally nearer to the men's pole vault quota, ranking 42nd with 1173 points.

Men

100 m (10.00)
Abdul Hakim Sani Brown - 9.97 (+0.3) - standard
Hiroki Yanagita - 1259 (29/56 in quota)
Shuhei Tada - 1229 (38/56 in quota)
Akihiro Higashida - 1222 (in quota)
Yoshihide Kiryu - 1206 (in quota)
Ryo Wada - 1196 (in quota)

200 m (20.16)
Towa Uzawa - 1271 (27/48 in quota)
Koki Ueyama - 1207 (36/48 in quota)
Shota Iizuka - 1207 (37/48 in quota)
Yudai Nishi - 1183 (49/48 in quota)

400 m (45.00)
Kentaro Sato - 44.77 - standard
Fuga Sato - 44.88 - standard
Yuki Joseph Nakajima - 1248 (41/48 in quota)

800 m (1:44.70)
none

1500 m (3:33.50)
none

5000 m (13:05.00)
Kazuya Shiojiri - 1161 (51/42 in quota)
Hyuga Endo - 1157 (54/42 in quota)

10000 m (27:00.00)
Tomoki Ota - 1249 (25/27 in quota)
Jun Kasai - 1232 (27/27 in quota)
Akira Aizawa - 1228 (29/27 in quota)

Men's 110 mH (13.27)
Rachid Muratake - 13.04 (-0.9) - standard
Shunsuke Izumiya - 13.06 (+1.3) - standard
Shusei Nomoto - 13.20 (+0.9) - standard
Shunya Takayama - 1280 (in quota)
Taiga Yokochi - 1216 (in quota)

Men's 400 mH (48.70)
Ken Toyoda - 48.36 - standard
Kazuki Kurokawa - 48.58 - standard
Kaito Tsutsue - 48.58 - standard
Yusaku Kodama - 1238 (in quota)
Haruto Deguchi - 1223 (in quota)

Men's 3000 mSC (8:15.00)
Ryuji Miura - 8:13.70 - standard
Ryoma Aoki - 1245 (24/36 in quota)
Seiya Sunada - 1177 (37/36 in quota)

Men's High Jump (2.33 m)
Ryoichi Akamatsu - 1261 (10/32 in quota)
Tomohiro Shinno - 1232 (17/32 in quota)
Yuto Seko - 1186 (25/32 in quota)
Naoto Hasegawa - 1184 (in quota)

Men's Pole Vault (5.82 m)
Shingo Sawa - 1173 (42/32 in quota)

Men's Long Jump (8.27 m)
Yuki Hashioka - 8.28 m (+1.4) - standard
Yuto Toriumi - 1182 (34/32 in quota)

Men's Triple Jump (17.22 m)
Hikaru Ikehata - 1147 (42/32 in quota)

Men's Shot Put (21.50 m)
none

Men's Discus Throw (67.20 m)
none

Men's Hammer Throw (78.20 m)
Shota Fukuda - 1145 (38/32 in quota)

Men's Javelin Throw (85.50 m)
Roderick Genki Dean - 1243 (12/32 in quota)
Yuta Sakiyama - 1142 (32/32 in quota)
Ryohei Arai - 1140 (36/32 in quota)

Men's Marathon (2:08:10)
Suguru Osako - 2:06:13
Naoki Koyama - 2:06:33
Akira Akasaki - 2:09:01

Men's 20 km RW (1:20:10)
Koki Ikeda - 1:16:51
Ryo Hamanishi - 1:17:42
Yuta Koga - 1:17:42

Men's Decathlon (8460)
Yuma Maruyama - 1185 (29/24 in quota)

Women

100 m (11.07)
none

200 m (22.57)
Remi Tsuruta - 1158 (53/48 in quota)

400 m (50.95)
none

800 m (1:59.30)
none

1500 m (4:02.50)
Nozomi Tanaka - 1248 (30/45 in quota)
Yume Goto - 1176 (50/45 in quota)

5000 m (14:52.00)
Nozomi Tanaka - 14:29.18 - standard
Yuma Yamamoto - 1187 (31/42 in quota)
Ririka Hironaka - 1172 (35/42 in quota)
Wakana Kabasawa - 1160 (in quota)

10000 m (30:40.00)
Ririka Hironaka - 1286 (24/27 in quota)
Rino Goshima - 1246 (26/27 in quota)
Haruka Kokai - 1236 (27/27 in quota)

Women's 100 mH (12.77)
Yumi Tanaka - 1233 (33/40 in quota)
Asuka Terada - 1212 (40/40 in quota)
Mako Fukube - 1209 (43/40 in quota)

Women's 400 mH (54.85)
none

Women's 3000 mSC (9:23.00)
none

Women's High Jump (1.97 m)
Nagisa Takahashi - 1151 (36/32 in quota)

Women's Pole Vault (4.73 m)
Misaki Morota - 1144 (32/32 in quota)

Women's Long Jump (6.86 m)
Sumire Hata - 6.97 m (+0.5) - standard

Women's Triple Jump (14.55 m)
Mariko Morimoto - 1189 (20/32 in quota)

Women's Shot Put (18.80 m)
none

Women's Discus Throw (64.50 m)
none

Women's Hammer Throw (74.00 m)
Joy McArthur - 1107 (41/32 in quota)

Women's Javelin Throw (64.00 m)
Haruka Kitaguchi - 67.38 m - standard
Marina Saito - 1168 (17/32 in quota)
Momone Ueda - 1151 (23/32 in quota)
Yuka Sato - 1128 (in quota)

Women's Marathon (2:26:50)
Honami Maeda - 2:18:59
Yuka Suzuki - 2:24:09
Mao Ichiyama - 2:24:43

Women's 20 Km RW (1:29:20)
Nanako Fujii - 1:27:59 - standard
Kumiko Okada - 1:29:03 - standard
Ayane Yanai - 1170 (34/48 in quota)

Women's Heptathlon (6480)
none

© 2024 Brett Larner, all rights reserved

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