Skip to main content

Running The 2020 Tokyo Olympics Marathon Course Part One - Women's Marathon Test Run



It's one year until the women's marathon at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. For the second year in a row I went out to run about 31 km of the course at the exact time that the women will be racing it. As with last year, I started outside the Olympic Stadium in Sendagaya, ran up to the 15 km turnaround in Asakusa and back to the 20 km point near Nihonbashi, then cut out the out-and-back sections to 24.5 km and 33 km and instead headed back the 10 km or so to the stadium.


Starting at 6:00 a.m. sharp, I ran a steady pace just under 5:00/km and made it back to the stadium a little after 9:15 a.m. with about 45 minutes of time lost to red lights, shooting video and live Tweeting, buying drinks and the odd pit stop. Every half hour I stopped to take temperature and humidity readings to get an idea of what kind of conditions the women will probably be facing a year from now.


It's been a relatively cool summer so far in Tokyo with an extended rainy season that kept things from heating up until late July. Today was set to be the hottest day yet in Tokyo this year, with humidity to match. My gear for measuring temps and humidity flashes when it thinks conditions are too dangerous for exercise. Just before the 6:00 a.m. women's marathon start time temperatures were about 29˚C with humidity of over 80% under cloudless skies, enough to make it flash before I even started running.

Over the course of the next three hours as I followed the course around the downtown area the temperature climbed about 3 degrees, with humidity falling about 10%. Although the conditions were overall better than when I did the same run last year,  it subjectively felt like the humidity was impacting me harder. I don't remember feeling dizzy or being dripping with sweat until well into the run last year, but this time around when I stopped to shoot video of the first downhill just over a kilometer into the run I already was, both.

After 7:00 a.m. a light breeze began to blow once I was past Nihonbashi, not really enough to affect running performance but enough to feel cool and refreshing. It faded, but later in the run around 8:30 it came back, bringing with it a gossamer thin cloud cover. The temperature actually fell for a while, but after I got back to the Olympic Stadium, by 9:30 a.m., three and a half hours after the start time, the temperature jumped to 33˚C and continued to climb.

And in that you can see the biggest benefit of the start time's move from 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 a.m. During last year's run when the start time was still set to be 7:00 a.m., the temperature jumped at around 9:30 a.m., about the time you'd expect the medalists to be finishing the women's marathon +/-. The temperature jumped again this year around 9:30, but with a 6:00 a.m. start conditions were still a little more bearable two and a half hours into the run at 8:30 a.m. The sun was also lower this time, with better shade coverage from buildings on the east side of all the north-south sections.


The conditions overall were still dangerous for a marathon, literally. Using the heat index scale, the section along the Kanda River from the top of the hill to the turn at Suidobashi where runners are running straight into the rising sun totally exposed, and the entire second half of the race scored in the "danger" zone, with the rest of the first half advising "extreme caution." But for at least the front-end contenders the shift to an earlier start time will partly lessen the risk in the last part of the race. Good luck to the back-of-the-packers, though. Be careful out there. My first clear memory of the marathon was of Gabriela Andersen-Schiess at the Los Angeles Olympics. We don't need that, or worse, again.

One thing that was noticeable this time, one year out from the main event, was that I didn't see any media out on the course. Last year they were everywhere, with reporters running short sections and TV camera crews shooting footage of models running here and there and dropping "It's hot!" soundbites. This time there was one crew at the start shooting footage of some official taking weather readings. I saw officials setting up gear to take readings at two other places on the course but no other media. Not sure what to make of that.

I did, though, see three of the men who will be trying to make the Tokyo Olympics marathon team at next month's MGC Race Olympic trials. Just past half an hour into the run I passed Fujitsu teammates Kengo Suzuki and Kohei Ogino, both longshots, heading the other way toward the short uphill section around 40 km. An hour later after going through the Asakusa turnaround I passed one of the four heavy favorites to make the team, 2018 Fukuoka International Marathon winner Yuma Hattori from the Toyota team, on his way up to Asakusa followed by a support staff member on a bicycle. Next Friday, a year out from the men's marathon, there are bound to be even more out there.

I didn't see any of the women who'll be running the MGC Race, but you know that they're out there too, spending time on the course, getting a feel for running it in the same kind of conditions a year from now. You can be sure that every person who makes the Japanese team will be totally prepared to handle the conditions the best they can. This is a home soil Olympics and one of the medals the home crowd cares the most about somebody winning. This one's for all the marbles. If you're reading this and are planning on being in either the women's or men's races, you'd better be ready too.

The tentative plan right now is to head back out Monday morning and run the first 10 km to Nihonbashi and then from there back along the course to the finish, about 23 km, with a special guest. Next Friday with one year to go until the men's marathon I'll cover the entire second half from 20 km to the finish including the two out-and-back sections I cut today, maybe a little more. Last year there was a pretty big difference in the weather conditions on the two runs due to a typhoon passing through Tokyo a few hours before I started the men's marathon test run. This year we'll see how things shape up for what the men may be up against.

© 2019 Brett Larner, all rights reserved

Buy Me A Coffee

Comments

TokyoRacer said…
Once again, interesting!
For you American readers, here's a quick conversion chart:
29C = 84F
30C = 86F
31C = 88F
32C = 90F
33C = 91F

And for other athletes who will be competing later than 9:00am, temperatures this week at noon have been around 35C/95F (hotter in the sun).
Not coolish!
ken said…
Too bad they won't start the race at midnight.
Too bad the Olympics are being held in August rather than October. All for the sake of TV.
The lack of consideration for Olympic marathoners is appalling. LA, Barcelona, Atlanta, Athens, Beijing have all been hothouses. Some day an Olympic level competitor will die. How about moving the marathon to the Winter Olympics ?
Anonymous said…
You can’t move the marathon to the winter. For the same treason x-country won’t be a winter sport. Hot weather benefits the sprints. The olympics isn’t all about the marathon (or is it?). It’s the Summer Olympics. It’s supposed to be hot. “For the sale of tv.” If the Olympics weren’t televised, they wouldn’t exist. The athletes aren’t amateurs anymore.
Anonymous said…
Thanks Brett for another informative article. Tokyo 1991 WC and Osaka 2007 WC would be good competitions to study and compare, to see how those athletes coped with adverse conditions.
Andrew Armiger said…
Love the Coolish plug, good fun. 😁
I probably missed it, will the MGC races be run on the Olympic route?
Brett Larner said…
Same course as the Olympics but with a start and finish outside the stadium as it's not finished yet.

Most-Read This Week

One Month Until the Japanese Olympic Marathon Trials

It's one month to go until what's bound to be the best marathon of 2019, Japan's 2020 Tokyo Olympics marathon trials, the Sept. 15 Marathon Grand Championship Race. Up to now Japan has typically picked its Olympic and World Championships marathon teams based on performances in a series of specific races, primarily the Fukuoka International Marathon, Tokyo Marathon and Lake Biwa Marathon for men, and the Saitama International Marathon, Osaka International Women's Marathon and Nagoya Women's Marathon for women. This time around they're going with a U.S.-style one-shot trials race, the MGC Race.

People had a nearly two-year window from August, 2017 to April this year to hit tough standards to qualify. Only 34 men and 15 women made it, and after withdrawals for the Doha World Championships the MGC Race's final entry list is just 31 men and 12 women. Swedish Athletics Federation official Lorenzo Nesicalled it "the most difficult marathon race ever to quali…

MGC Race Olympic Marathon Trials Qualifier - Naoki Okamoto

Naoki Okamotoage: 35
sponsor: Chugoku Denryoku
graduated from: Tottori Chuo Ikuei H.S., Meiji University

best time inside MGC window:
2:11:29, 1st, 2018 Hokkaido Marathon

PB: 2:11:29, 1st, 2018 Hokkaido Marathon

other PBs:
5000 m: 13:37.71 (2009) 10000 m: 28:05.84 (2011) half marathon: 1:02:16 (2009)

marathons inside MGC window (Aug. 1 2017 – April 30 2019)
DNF, 2019 Beppu-Oita Marathon
1st, 2018 Hokkaido Marathon, 2:11:29 – PB
DNF, 2018 Boston Marathon

other major results:
4th, 2019 Shibetsu Half Marathon, 1:03:53
2nd, 2019 New Year Ekiden Fourth Stage (22.4 km), 1:05:13
1st, 2018 Chugoku Corporate Ekiden Sixth Stage (19.0 km), 56:25 – CR
1st, 2018 Ome 30 km Road Race, 1:33:09
21st, 2017 Tokyo Marathon, 2:13:53

We’re picking Okamoto as our official dark horse of the men’s race. The second-oldest man in a field, Okamoto is a journeyman corporate leaguer who never broke 2:12 and whose PBs all came a decade ago. But, nearing the end of his career, over the last two years he has really come on…

Running the 2020 Tokyo Olympics Marathon Course Part Three - Men's Marathon and Overall Summary

Today marks one year until the men's marathon at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. For the third time in the last week, once last Friday with one year to go to the Olympic women's marathon, once on Monday with a likely competitor in the men's marathon, and again today, I ran most of the Olympic marathon course taking temperature and humidity readings every half an hour to get a handle on what kind of conditions athletes in each race can expect to be facing. Between the three runs I covered about 80 km, and including the two times I did it last summer two years out from the women's marathon and men's marathon about 135 km, on the Olympic course. To get it out of the way off the bat, a couple of days ago a few readers told me that the Buy Me A Coffee button wasn't working. I think the problem has been fixed, so if you're so inclined please feel free to use it. Your support for JRN is always really appreciated.

And now on to the run.


This time out I went to the start …