Skip to main content

World U20 Championships - Day One Japanese Results



On the first day of competition at the World U20 Championships in Tampere, Finland, Japanese runners were the first non-East African runners across the line in both of the day's distance finals. In the boys' 10000 m Takuro Miura was 9th in 30:12.25 almost three laps behind championships record-setting Rhonex Kipruto (Kenya). In the women's 5000 m, Tomomi Musembi Takamatsu was 7th in 15:55.74, just over 21 seconds out of the medals. The talented Miku Moribayashi was last in 17:08.55.

In qualifying rounds, nine of the eleven Japanese athletes in action advanced. Ayaka Kawata and Ayano Shiomi led the way in the women's 800 m, both winning their heats and clocking the two fastest times among all qualifiers. Yuki Hashioka also recorded the best mark in the men's long jump qualifying rounds, jumping 7.92 m (+1.1 m/s) to head into the final ranked #1. Yugo Sakai jumped a PB of 7.69 m (+2.0 m/s) to join Hashioka in the final with the #3 ranking.

World U20 Championships Day One Japanese Results

Tampere, Finland, 7/10/18
complete results

Finals
Men's 10000 m Final
1. Rhonex Kipruto (Kenya) - 27:21.08 - MR
2. Jacob Kiplimo (Uganda) - 27:40.36
3. Berihu Aregawi (Ethiopia) - 27:48.41 - PB
4. Solomon Kiplimo Boit (Kenya) - 27:57.44 - PB
5. Olika Adugna (Ethiopia) - 28:39.67 - PB
-----
9. Takuro Miura (Japan) - 30:12.25

Women's 5000 m Final
1. Beatrice Chebet (Kenya) - 15:30.77 - PB
2. Ejhayehu Taye (Ethopia) - 15:30.87 - PB
3. Girmawit Gebrzihair (Ethiopia) - 15:34.01 - PB
4. Sarah Chelangat (Uganda) - 15:43.01
5. Hellen Ekarare Lobun (Kenya) - 15:43.07
-----
7. Tomomi Musembi Takamatsu (Japan) - 15:55.74
14. Miku Moribayashi (Japan) - 17:08.55

Qualifying Rounds
Men's 100 m Heat 1 +1.1 m/s
1. Lalu Muhammed Zohri (Indonesia) - 10.30 - Q
2. Daisuke Miyamoto (Japan) - 10.50 - Q
3. Isayah Boers (Netherlands) - 10.66 - Q

Men's 100 m Heat 3 +0.5 m/s
1. Chad Miller (Great Britain) - 10.33 - PB, Q
2. Michael Bentley (Jamaica) - 10.34 - Q
3. Satoru Fukushima (Japan) - 10.37 - PB, Q

Women's 800 m Heat 1
1. Ayano Shiomi (Japan) - 2:05.13 - Q
2. Jackline Wambui (Kenya) - 2:05.27 - Q
3. Samantha Watson (U.S.A.) - 2:06.34 - Q

Women's 800 m Heat 3
1. Ayaka Kawata (Japan) - 2:05.08 - Q
2. Lydia Jeruto Lagat (Kenya) - 2:05.63 - Q
3. Maeliss Trapeau (France) - 2:05.72 - Q

Women's 3000 m Steeplechase Heat 1
1. Celiphine Chepteek Chespol (Kenya) - 9:45.60 - Q
2. Montanna McAvoy (Australia) - 9:59.67 - PB, Q
3. Manami Nishiyama (Japan) - 10:02.89 - PB, Q

Women's 3000 m Steeplechase Heat 3
1. Peruth Chemutai (Uganda) - 9:34.34 - Q
2. Mercy Chepkurui (Kenya) - 9:50.05 - Q
3. Etalemahu Sintayehu (Ethiopia) - 9:52.92 - PB, Q
-----
9. Yuka Nosue (Japan) - 10:39.24

Men's Long Jump Qualification Group A
1. Yuki Hashioka (Japan) - 7.92 m (+1.1 m/s) - Q
2. Keqi Zhou (China) - 7.65 m (+3.1 m/s)
3. Shakwon Coke (Jamaica) - 7.55 m (+0.0 m/s) - q
4. Bartosz Gabka (Poland) - 7.51 m (+0.1 m/s) - q

Men's Long Jump Qualification Group B
1. Wayne Pinnock (Jamaica) - 7.76 m (+1.7 m/s) - Q
2. Yugo Sakai (Japan) - 7.69 m (+2.0 m/s) - PB, q
3. M. Sreeshankar (India) - 7.68 m (-0.3 m/s) - q

Women's Discus Throw Qualification Group B
1. Helena Leveelahti (Finland) - 54.87 m - Q
2. Silinda Oneisi Morales (Cuba) - 54.05 m - Q
3. Jorinde Van Klinken (Netherlands) - 53.58 m - Q
-----
9. Maki Saito (Japan) - 49.84 m - q

Women's Javelin Throw Qualification Group A
1. Sara Zabarino (Italy) - 53.99 m - PB, Q
2. Yuleixi Anai Angulo (Ecuador) - 52.62 m - q
3. Tomoka Kuwazoe (Japan) - 52.04 m - q

Women's Javelin Throw Qualification Group B
1. Carolina Visca (Italy) - 53.49 m - q
2. Alina Shukh (Ukraine) - 51.76 m - q
3. Dana Baker (U.S.A.) - 51.09 m - q
-----
7. Sae Takemoto (Japan) - 48.80 m

© 2018 Brett Larner, all rights reserved

Buy Me A Coffee

Comments

Most-Read This Week

2018 Japanese Distance Rankings - Updated 11/11/18

JRN's 2018 Japanese track and road distance running rankings. Overall rankings are calculated using runners' times and placings in races over 5000 m, 10000 m, half-marathon and marathon and the strength of these performances relative to others in the top ten in each category. Click any image to enlarge.


Past years:
2017 ・ 2016 ・2015 ・ 2014 ・ 2013 ・ 2012 ・ 2011

© 2018 Brett Larner, all rights reserved

18-Year-Old Waithaka Runs 10000 m World Leading Time at Nittai - Weekend Roundup

photo by @tsutsugo55225

For the second time in the last three weeks, a Japan-based Kenyan ran the fastest time in the world this year for 10000 m at Yokohama's Nittai University Time Trials series. On October 20th it was 2015 World U18 Championships 3000 m gold medalist Richard Kimunyan (Hitachi Butsuryu), 20, with a 27:14.70  that surpassed Ugandan Joshua Cheptegei's world-leading mark by almost five seconds. This time it was 2018 World U20 Championships 5000 m silver medalist Stanley Waithaka (Yakult), 18, taking almost two minutes off his PB to break Kimunyan's mark with a 27:13.01 win.

Both winners received support from 2014 Commonwealth Games steeplechase gold medalist Jonathan Ndiku (Hitachi Butsuryu), who ran season bests for 2nd place each time, 27:50.38 three weeks ago and 27:28.27 on Saturday. 2013 World U18 Championships 3000 m bronze medalist Alexander Mutiso (ND Software) was also under 28 minutes, running just off his PB at 27:42.16 for 3rd. Kazuma Taira (Kan…

Go Ahead and Call It a Comeback - Niiya Breaks Shibui's Course Record in Return to Road Racing

Ladies and gentlemen, Hitomi Niiya is back.

You might remember Hitomi Niiya from the 2013 Moscow World Championships 10000 m, where she led the entire way only to get destroyed over the last lap and finish 5th in 30:56.70. That made her the third-fastest Japanese woman ever over that distance, but not long after that race she quit the sport entirely, getting an office job as far away from athletics as she could and not running for almost five years.

But the pull of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics is strong, and, now 30, early this year she made the decision to try to make a comeback. Under the eye of former men's 800 m national record holder Masato Yokota she ran a 3000 m and two 5000 m time trials on the track between April and October before choosing the East Japan Women's Ekiden for her return to the roads and the longer distances.

The East Japan Women's Ekiden celebrated its 34th running Sunday, 9 stages totaling 42.195 km through the Fukushima countryside with teams from eac…