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Kawauchi and Kiyara Headline Wan Jin Shi Marathon

Yuki Kawauchi (Saitama Pref. Gov't) returns to Taiwan's Wan Jin Shi Marathon this Sunday for his marathon of the post-Yuta Shitara era. The runner-up in Wan Jin Shi in 2016, Kawauchi is ranked #1 in the field and comes to Wan Jin Shi with wins in his last three marathons but faces a solid field including fellow sub-2:10 man Peter Kiplagat Sitenei, last year's runner-up Tsegaye Debele (Ethiopia), and the only man to beat him last time around, 2016 winner and course record holder William Chebon Chebor (Kenya). Kawauchi plans to use the hilly race as a tune-up for his main marathon of the spring season, April's Boston Marathon.

At the opposite end of the spectrum, Rael Kiyara Nguriatukei (Kenya), winner of the 2012 Hamburg Marathon before being stripped of her title and suspended for a positive post-race test for norandrosterone, has the fastest recent time in the women's field with a 2:26:22 winning time at last year's Chongqing Marathon. Close behind is Chemtai Rionotukei (Kenya), runner-up in Taiyuan last year in 2:26:30. The 2:28-level trio of Tizita Terecha Dida (Ethiopia), Ji Hyang Kim (North Korea) and Rebecca Jepchirchir Korir (Kenya) could give the lead duo some trouble if the race turns out a little on the slower side.

In either case, race organizers are predicting course records in both races. Live splits are available here, with a live stream set to kick off at 6:00 a.m. local time on Sunday. Watch the live stream here:



New Taipei City Wan Jin Shi Marathon

Elite Field Highlights
New Taipei City, Taiwan, 3/18/18
times listed are best within last three years except where noted
click here for complete field listing

Men
Yuki Kawauchi (Japan/Saitama Pref. Gov't) - 2:09:01 (2nd, Gold Coast 2016)
Peter Kiplagat Sitenei (Kenya) - 2:09:43 (3rd, Rennes 2015)
Shadrack Kipkogey (Kenya) - 2:10:39 (5th, Seville 2017)
Johnstone Kibet Maiyo (Kenya) - 2:10:50 (1st, Wuhan 2016)
Stanley Kipchirchir Koech (Kenya) - 2:10:58 (1st, Stockholm 2016)
Sylvester Kimeli Teimet (Kenya) - 2:11:00 (4th, Hangzhou 2017)
Isaac Korir (Bahrain) - 2:11:02 (5th, Hangzhou 2017)
William Rutto (Kenya) - 2:11:31 (6th, Zhengzhou 2017)
William Chebon Chebor (Kenya) - 2:13:05 (1st, Wanjinshi 2016)
Tsegaye Debele (Ethiopia) - 2:17:04 (2nd, Wanjinshi 2017)
Benjamin Siwa (Uganda) - 1:01:56 (4th, Cardiff Half 2016)
Aredom Tiumay (Ethiopia) - 1:02:40 (Bahir Dar Half 2016)

Women
Rael Kiyara Nguriatukei (Kenya) - 2:26:22 (1st, Chongqing 2017)
Chemtai Rionotukei (Kenya) - 2:26:30 (2nd, Taiyuan 2017)
Tizita Terecha Dida (Ethiopia) - 2:28:02 (!st, Guangzhou 2015)
Ji Hyang Kim (North Korea) - 2:28:06 (1st, Pyongyang 2016)
Rebecca Jepchirchir Korir (Kenya) - 2:28:16 (3rd, Rotterdam 2016)
Chao Yue (China) - 2:30:27 (3rd, Chongqing 2016)
Salome Jerono Biwott (Kenya) - 2:30:47 (2nd, Hannover 2016)
Mestawot Tadesse Shankutie (Ethiopia) - 2:31:38 (2nd, Rome 2017)
Bekele Geji Geletu (Ethiopia) - 2:34:05 (3rd, Rabat 2017)
Gladys Jerotich Kibiwot (Bahrain) - 2:34:23 (9th, Seoul 2016)
Il Sim Pak (North Korea) - 2:35:33 (5th, Pyongyang 2017)
Ednah Jerotich Kwambai (Kenya) - 2:39:55 (2nd, Kassel 2015)

© 2018 Brett Larner, all rights reserved

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