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The Biggest International Championships Outside the Olympics - Hangzhou Asian Games Preview and Entry Lists

 

The biggest international championships outside the Olympics are underway in Hangzhou, China, with 12,500 athletes from 45 countries representing 60% of the world’s population competing across 61 sports at the 19th Asian Games. Athletics runs Sept. 29 to Oct. 5, and while official event entry lists haven’t been released yet JRN has pieced them together from the national team entry lists in the events where Japanese athletes will be competing. Additions and corrections welcome, and we’ll update the lists below as official entry and start lists are released. Complete meet schedule and results here

4 Japanese athletes and one relay team arrive in Hangzhou ranked #1 in their events. The gold medalist at July’s Asian Championships, NR holder Sumire Hata leads the women’s long jump field at 6.97 m, with a 21 cm margin over India’s Shaili Singh and another 11 cm over China’s Shiqi Xiong and Sri Lanka’s Lakshini Sandaradura.

Kentaro Sato is the fastest in the men’s 400 m field with his 44.77 NR at last month’s Budapest World Championships. Fuga Sato is his closest competition with a 44.88 in Budapest, with Qatari Ashram Osman, Sri Lankan Kaling Kumarage and Saudi Arabia’s Mazen Al Yasen all coming in between 45.01 and 45.08. The chances of a Japanese 1-2 are good.

Shunya Takayama has the fastest mark in the men’s 110 mH field at 13.10, with China’s Shenglong Zhu ranked 2nd at 13.25 and Shuhei Ishikawa 3rd at 13.36 just ahead of China’s Zhouyi Xu, 4th at 13.39. Here too there’s a chance for double Japanese medals.

In everyone’s favorite international championship event, Yohei Ikeda is ranked #1 in the men’s marathon with his 2:06:53 debut in Osaka this spring. Ethiopian-born Bahraini Shumi Dechasa ran 2:06:59 in Geneva 2 years ago and 2:07:52 for 9th at the Oregon World Championships last year, but he’s been off more than on the last few years, so it’s hard to pick between him and someone running only their 2nd marathon.

The experienced Toshiki Sadakata is 3rd at 2:07:24 from Osaka this year, but right behind him are China’s Jie He and Shaoyui Yang, both sub-2:08 in Wuxi in the spring, and with the motivation of a home soil international championships you know they’re going to be in it for medals. Also of note, if he starts Ilryong Han will be the first North Korean to compete in the marathon since 2019 pre-pandemic. Two North Korean women are also scheduled to compete in the women’s marathon.

Japan has the fastest 4x100 m relay team in Asia in the last three years with a 37.71 from Budapest, but with a different lineup in Hangzhou they could have competition from China, Thailand, Taiwan and South Korea.

Along with Fuga Sato, Shuhei Ishikawa and Toshiki Sadakata, Japan also has realistic silver and bronze medal contenders in the women’s 5000 m, 10000 m, 100 mH, pole vault, triple jump, javelin throw, 20 kmRW, 35kmRW mixed relay, marathon, heptathlon, and the men’s 100 m, 200 m, 5000 m, 10000 m, 400 mH, 3000 mSC, high jump, 20 kmRW and decathlon.

Ririka Hironaka is ranked 3rd in the 5000 m behind Kenyan-born duo Daisy Jepkemei and Caroline Kipkirui of Kazakhstan, and 2nd behind Kipkirui in the 10000 m. Right behind her in both races is Bahrain’s Bontu Edao Rebitu. The 5000 m field is decent, but the 10000 m field looks to be very thin with only the 3 women above under 33:30 in the last 3 years.

Bahraini marathon imports from Kenya and Ethiopia, Eunice Chumba and Desi Jisa Mokonin have both run under 2:21 and are pretty much guaranteed to take gold and silver if they start, but the race for bronze looks good with Chinese duo Deshun Zhang and Zhixuan Li having run 2:24:05 and 2:26:28 in Nagoya this year, and JV-squad JPN women Hikari Onishi and Mirai Waku both coming in with 2:25-high marks.

China and India look set to sweep the 100 mH unless Masumi Aoki or Yumi Tanaka can squeeze out #3-ranked Yuwei Lin of China. China also looks poised for a 1-2 in the pole vault, with Misaki Morota comfortably in the #3 ranking at 4.41 m over #4-ranked Anastasiya Ermakova of Kazakhstan.

In the men’s 100 m Japan’s chances rest pretty much with veteran Yoshihide Kiryu, who ran a quality 10.03 earlier this year that puts him at #1 in the field in 2023, but China’s Zhenye Xie should give him a run of it with a 10.05 SB and Qatari Femi Ogunode needs only a slight return to form to be in contention with both. The chances were lowered a bit in the 200 m with the withdrawal of Towa Uzawa, but Koki Ueyama is still in range of bronze, especially in Ogunode isn’t up to past level.

5000 m and 10000 m entrants Kazuya Shiojiri and Ren Tazawa are in reach of the podium, but both have the same primary competition in Ethiopian Bahraini Birhanu Balew and Thailand’s Kieran Tuntivate. Ryoichi Akamatsu and Tomohiro Shinno are in the same situation in the high jump, both 2 cm from 3rd-ranked Zhen Wang of China. The battle for gold between Qatari legend Mutaz Essa Barshim and South Korean Diamond League champ Sanghyeok Woo should be one of the highlights of the Games.

Japan doesn’t have a serious medal contender, but the men’s long jump could be the best single competition in athletics. India’s Sreeshankar leads with an 8.41 m jump in Bhubaneshwar earlier this year, 2023 Asian Championships gold medalist Yu-Tang Lin of Taiwan right behind him at 8.40 m, 2022 world champion Jianan Wang of China also right there at 8.36 m, and other 4 men between 8.15 m and 8.22 m including Japan’s Natsuki Yamakawa.

The men’s javelin is also looking great, with Indian Olympic and World champion Neeraj Chopra, Budapest silver medalist Arshad Nadeem of Pakistan, and Budapest 5th-placer Kishore Jena of India all podium-bound. It would take a DNS or off day from one of them for Japan’s Roderick Genki Dean to break into the medals, but with only 1.62 m separating him from Jena it’s not impossible.

Ryoma Aoki isn’t likely to outrun Indian Avinash Sable for gold in the 3000 mSC, but with a 48.58 PB in Budapest Kazuki Kurokawa is right there with Qatar’s Abderrahman Alsaleck, the fastest in the 400 mH field at 48.56. Decent medal chances also exist in the 20 kmRW, where it’s a race for silver and bronze between Japan’s Yutaro Murayama and Tomohiro Noda, China’s Zhaozhao Wang, and India’s Vikash Singh behind heavy favorite Jun Zhang of China, the 35 kmRW mixed relay, and the decathlon, where it’s likely to be a showdown between China’s Qihao Sun and Japan’s Yuma Maruyama.

Lone 800 m and 1500 m entrants Sho Kawamoto and Kazuki Kawamura have fallen off their NR-setting bests and aren’t likely to factor into the medals without slow races to help them out. Likewise for Seito Yamamoto, ranked 4th in the pole vault field of a performance from last year but not having a great season in 2023. Budapest silver medalist Ernest Obiena from the Philippines is a lock for gold.

Hangzhou Asian Games

Athletics Entry List Highlights
Hangzhou, China, 29 Sept.- 5 Oct. 2023
times listed are athletes' best in 2021-2023 except where noted
complete entry lists

Women

800 m Heats: 9:20 a.m., Oct. 3 / Final: 19:25 Oct. 4
Chunyu Wang (China) - 1:57.00 (Tokyo Olympics 2021)
Tharushi Karunarathna (Sri Lanka) - 2:00.66 (Bangkok Asian Championships 2023)
Gayanthika Artigala (Sri Lanka) - 2:01.20 (Birmingham 2022)
Chanda (India) - 2:01.58 (Bangkok Asian Championships 2023)
Xinyu Rao (China) - 2:02.38 (Xi'an 2021)
Hamilan Bains (India) - 2:02.57 (Patiala 2021)
Ayano Shiomi (Japan) - 2:04.06 (Brisbane 2023)

1500 m Final: 20:20, Oct. 1
Hamilan Bains (India) - 4:05.39 (Warangal 2021)
Winfred Mutile Yavi (Bahrain) - 4:05.54 (Nairobi 2022)
Deeksha (India) - 4:06.07 (Bhubaneshwar 2023)
Gayanthika Artigala (Sri Lanka) - 4:09.12 (Colombo 2021)
Yume Goto (Japan) - 4:09.50 (Chitose 2022)
Chunyu Wang (China) - 4:11.42 (Chongqing 2021)
Thi Oanh Nguyen (Viet Nam) - 4:12.28 (Budapest World Championships 2023)

5000 m Final: 19:50, Oct. 3
Daisy Jepkemei (Kazakhstan) - 14:45.69 (Montreuil 2022)
Caroline Kipkirui (Kazakhstan) - 14:52.54 (Oregon World Championships 2022)
Ririka Hironaka (Japan) - 14:52.84 (Tokyo Olympics 2021)
Bontu Edao Rebitu (Bahrain) - 15:02.22 (Algiers 2023)
Parul Chaudhary (India) - 15:10.35 (Mt. SAC 2023)
Yuma Yamamoto (Japan) - 15:16.71 (Utsunomiya 2022)
Ankita (India) - 15:33.24 (Hiroshima 2023)

10000 m - Final: 20:05, Sept. 29
Caroline Kipkirui (Kazakhstan) - 30:17.64 (Oregon World Championships 2022)
Ririka Hironaka (Japan) - 30:39.71 (Oregon World Championships 2022)
Bontu Edao Rebitu (Bahrain) - 31:40.02 (Algiers 2023)

100 mH Heats: 9:15 a.m., Sept. 30 / Final: 21:15 / Oct. 1
Yanni Wu (China) - 12.76 (Chengdu 2023)
Jyothi Yarraji (India) - 12.78 (Chengdu 2023)
Yuwei Lin (China) - 12.85 (Xi'an 2021)
Masumi Aoki (Japan)  - 12.86 (Niigata 2022)
Yumi Tanaka (Japan) - 12.89 (Yokohama 2023)

400 mH Heats: 10:40 a.m., Oct. 2 / Final: 19:20, Oct. 3
Oluwakemi Adekoya (Bahrain) - 53.09 (Budapest World Championships 2023)
Jiadie Mo (China) - 54.89 (Xi'an 2021)
Vithya Ramraj (India) - 55.43 (Chandigarh 2023)
Aminat Jamal (Bahrain) - 55.51 (Algiers 2023)
Ami Yamamoto (Japan) - 56.06 (Osaka 2023)
Robyn Brown (Philippines) - 56.15 (Phnom Penh 2023)
Thi Huyen Nguyen (Viet Nam) - 56.29 (Phnom Penh 2023)

Pole Vault Final: 19:00, Oct. 2
Ling Li (China) - 4.70 m (Xi'an 2021))
Chunge Niu (China) - 4.62 m (Xiamen 2023)
Misaki Morota (Japan) - 4.41 m (Yamagata 2023)
Anastasiya Ermakova (Kazakhstan) - 4.20 m (Almaty 2022)
Chayanisa Chomchuendee (Thailand) - 4.10 m (Busan 2023)
Yi-Ju Shen (Taiwan) - 4.10 m (Taipei 2021)

Long Jump Qualification: 10:10 a.m., Oct. 1 / Final: 19:10, Oct. 2
Sumire Hata (Japan) - 6.97 m (Bangkok Asian Championships 2023)
Shaili Singh (India) - 6.76 m (Bengaluru 2023)
Shiqi Xiong (China) - 6.65 m (Quzhou 2023)
Lakshini Sandaradura (Sri Lanka) - 6.65 m (Colombo 2022)
Ancy Sojan Edappilly (India) - 6.56 m (Morabadi 2023)
Nga Yan Yue (Hong Kong) - 6.49 m (Lisbon 2022)

Triple Jump Final: 19:10, Oct. 4
Rui Zeng (China) - 14.26 m (Shenyang 2023)
Mariko Morimoto (Japan) - 14.16 m (Osaka 2023)
Parinya Chuaimaroeng (Thailand) - 14.08 m (Bangkok 2021)
Sharifa Davronova (Uzbekistan) - 14.04 m (Cali 2022)
Jie Chen (China) - 13.93 m (Shenyang 2023)
Thi Huong Nguyen (Viet Nam) - 13.68 m (Bangkok Asian Championships 2023)
Maria Londa (Indonesia) - 13.60 m (Timika 2021)

Javelin Throw Final: 20:10, Oct. 3
Huihui Lyu (China) - 66.55 m (Chengdu 2021)
Shiying Liu (China) - 66.34 m (Tokyo Olympics 2021)
Sae Takemoto (Japan) - 62.39 m (Hiratsuka 2021)
Marina Saito (Japan) - 62.07 m (Hiroshima 2023)
Dilhane Lekamge (Sri Lanka) - 60.93 m (Bangkok Asian Championships 2023)

20 kmRW Final: 7:10 a.m., Sept. 29
Jiayu Yang (China) - 1:26:41 (Huangshan 2023)
Zhenxia Ma (China) - 1:26:43 (Huangshan 2023)
Priyanka (India) - 1:28:45 (Ranchi 2021)
Nanako Fujii (Japan) - 1:29:01 (Oregon World Championships 2022)
Galina Yakusheva (Kazakhstan) - 1:32:55 (Lutsk 2021)
Yukiko Umeno (Japan) - 1:33:38 (Nomi 2023)

35 kmRW Mixed Relay Final: 7:00 a.m., Oct. 4
Xueying Bai (China) - 2:40:59 (Huangshan 2023)
Shijie Qieyang (China) - 2:41:59 (Huangshan 2023)
Masumi Fuchise (Japan) - 2:52:57 (Budapest World Championships 2023)
Galina Yakusheva (Kazakhstan) - 2:54:50 (Oregon World Championships 2022)
Maika Yagi (Japan) - 2:55:55 (Wajima 2022)

Marathon Final: 7:10 a.m., Oct. 5
Eunice Chumba (Bahrain) - 2:20:02 (Seoul 2022)
Desi Jisa Mokonin (Bahrain) - 2:20:47 (Doha 2023)
Deshun Zhang (China) - 2:24:05 (Nagoya 2023)
Hikari Onishi (Japan) - 2:25:54 (Berlin 2022)
Mirai Waku (Japan) - 2:25:58 (Nagoya 2023)
Zhixuan Li (China) - 2:26:28 (Nagoya 2023)
Zhanna Mamazhanova (Kazakhstan) - 2:26:54 (Rotterdam 2022)
Alia Saeed (UAE) - 2:27:08 (Seville 2023)
Daeun Jeong (South Korea) - 2:28:32 (Seoul 2023)
Kyungsun Choi (South Korea) - 2:28:49 (Daegu 2023)
Munkzhaya Bayartsogt (Mongolia) - 2:29:25 (Rotterdam 2022)
Khishigsaikhan Galbadrakh (Mongolia)- 2:30:41 (Senshu 2023)
Kwangok Ri (North Korea) - 2:30:56 (Dongguan 2019)

Heptathlon Day 1: 9:00, Sept. 30 / Day 2: 9:00, Oct. 1
Ninali Zheng (China) - 6358 (Arona 2021) 
Ekaterina Veronica (Uzbekistan) - 6098 (Bangkok Asian Championships 2023)
Yuki Yamasaki (Japan) - 5975 (Kitakyushu 2021)
Swapna Barman (India) - 5840 (Bangkok Asian Championships 2023)
Karin Odama (Japan) - 5720 (Akita 2023)
Jingle Liu (China) - 5606 (Shenyang 2023)
Sarah Dequinan (Philippines) - 5446 (Bangkok Asian Championships 2023)

Men

100 m Heats: 21:42, Sept. 29 / SF: 19:30, Sept. 30 / Final: 21:55, Sept. 30
Femi Ogunode (Qatar) - 10.00 (Doha 2021)
Yoshihide Kiryu (Japan) - 10.03 (Osaka 2023)
Zhenye Xie (China) - 10.05 (Coral Gables 2023)
Guanfeng Chen (China) - 10.06 (Chongqing 2021)
Puripol Boonson (Thailand) - 10.09 (Cali 2022)
Muhammad Fahmi (Malaysia) - 10.09 (Cali 2022)
Kukyoung Kim (South Korea) - 10.09 (Tottori 2022)
Lalu Zohri (Indonesia) - 10.10 (Semarang 2022)
Yuki Koike (Japan) - 10.11 (Yokohama 2023)
Imranur Rahman (Bangladesh) - 10.11 (London 2023)

200 m Heats: 10:22 a.m., Oct. 1 / SF: 19:55, Oct. 1 / Final: 19:55, Oct. 2
Zhenye Xie (China) - 20.13 (Jacksonville 2022)
Femi Ogunode (Qatar) - 20.16 (Doha 2021)
Puripol Boonson (Thailand) - 20.19 (Almaty 2022)
Koki Ueyama (Japan) - 20.26 (Oregon World Championships 2022)
Chun-Han Yang (Taiwan)- 20.46 (Shizuoka 2023)
Yusuf Ali Abbas (Bahrain) - 20.50 (Plovdiv 2023)
Abdullah Mohammed (Saudi Arabia) - 20.50 (Riyadh 2022)
Seungwan Ko (South Korea) - 20.51 (Jeongseon 2022)
Amlan Borgohain (India) - 20.52 (Chengdu 2023)
Soraoat Dapbang (Thailand) - 20.54 (Almaty 2022)
Haibin Yan (China) - 20.56 (Chongqing 2021)

400 m - Heats: 19:25, Sept. 29 / SF: 9:55 a.m., Sept. 30 / Final: 20:10, Sept. 30
Kentaro Sato (Japan) - 44.77 (Budapest World Championships 2023)
Fuga Sato (Japan) - 44.88 (Budapest World Championships 2023)
Ashram Osman (Qatar) - 45.01 (Marrakesh 2023)
Kalinga Kumarage (Sri Lanka) - 45.07 (Diyagama 2023)
Mazen Al Yasen (Saudi Arabia) - 45.08 (Riyadh 2022)
Yousef Masrahi (Saudi Arabia) - 45.19 (Bangkok Asian Championships 2023)
Muhammed Variyathodi (India) - 45.36 (Bangkok Asian Championships 2023)
Amderrahman Alsaleck (Qatar) - 45.37 (Pretoria 2023)
Aruna Dharshana (Sri Lanka) - 45.45 (Diyagama 2023)
Muhammed Yahiya (India) - 45.63 (Bhubaneshwar 2023)

800 m Heats: 9:40 a.m., Oct. 2 / Final: 20:25, Oct. 3
Abubaker Abdalla (Qatar) - 1:45.22 (Leiden 2022)
Abdirahman Hassan (Qatar) - 1:45.25 (Strasbourg 2022)
Sho Kawamoto (Japan) - 1:45.83 (Chitose 2021)
Krishan Kumar (India) - 1:45.88 (Bangkok Asian Championships 2023)
Ebrahim Alzofairi (Kuwait) - 1:46.02 (Oordegem 2023)
Mohammed Pulikkalakath (India) - 1:46.17 (Oordegem 2023)
Dezhu Liu (China) - 1:46.77 (Bangkok Asian Championships 2023)

1500 m Heats: 9:35 a.m., Sept. 30 / Final: 20:30, Oct. 1
Abdirahman Hassan (Qatar) - 3:34.24 (Nerja 2021)
Kazuki Kawamura (Japan) - 3:35.42 (Chitose 2021)
Mohamed Al Garni (Qatar) - 3:37.89 (Lignano Sabbiadoro 2022)
Zouhair Aouad (Bahrain) - 3:38.17 (Algiers 2023)
Ajay Saroj (India) - 3:38.24 (Budapest World Championships 2023)
Dezhu Liu (China) - 3:38.88 (Mt. Hood 2023)
Fayez Al Subaie (Saudi Arabia) - 3:39.24 (Algiers 2023)
Jinson Johnson (India) - 3:39.32 (Chandigarh 2023)

5000 m Final: 19:40, Oct. 4
Birhanu Balew (Bahrain) - 12:57.71 (Firenze 2021)
Kieran Tuntivate (Thailand) - 13:15.67 (Heusden-Zolder 2023)
Mohamed Al Garni (Qatar) - 13:16.28 (Oordegem 2023)
Kazuya Shiojiri (Japan) - 13:16.53 (Kyoto 2021)
Avinash Sable (India) - 13:19.30 (Mt. SAC 2023)
Dawit Fikadu (Bahrain) - 13:20.24 (Tokyo Olympics 2021)
Keita Sato (Japan) - 13:22.91 (Nobeoka 2022)

10000 m Final: 20:20, Sept. 30
Birhanu Balew (Bahrain) - 27:07.49 (Ostrava 2021)
Kieran Tuntivate (Thailand) - 27:17.14 (The Ten 2021)
Ren Tazawa (Japan) - 27:23.44 (Nittai Univ. Time Trials 2021)
Tariq Al Amri (Saudi Arabia) - 27:44.33 (London 2023)
Kazuya Shiojiri (Japan) - 27:45.18 (Hachioji Long Distance 2021)

110 mH Heats: 9:10 a.m., Oct. 1 / Final: 20:15, Oct. 2
Shunya Takayama (Japan) - 13.10 (Hiratsuka 2022)
Shenglong Zhu (China) - 13.25 (Shenyang 2023)
Shuhei Ishikawa (Japan) - 13.36 (Yokohama 2023)
Zhouyi Xu (China) - 13.39 (Bangkok Asian Championships 2023)
Yaqoub Alyouha (Kuwai) - 13.42 (Konya 2022)
Kuei-Ru Chen (Taiwan) - 13.49 (Tokyo 2022)

400 mH Heats: 10:15 a.m., Oct. 2 / Final: 19:35, Oct. 3
Abderrahman Alsaleck (Qatar) - 48.56 (Savona 2023)
Kazuki Kurokawa (Japan) - 48.58 (Budapest World Championships 2023)
Ming-Yang Peng (Taiwan) - 48.62 (Chengdu 2023)
Bassem Hemeida (Qatar) - 48.64 (Bangkok Asian Championships 2023)
Yusaku Kodama (Japan) - 48.77 (Yokohama 2023)
Zhiyu Xie (China) - 48.78 (Chengdu 2023)

3000 mSC Final: 19:15, Oct. 1
Avinash Sable (India) - 8:11.20 (Birmingham 2022)
Ryoma Aoki (Japan) - 8:20.09 (Osaka 2022)
Seiya Sunada (Japan) - 8:26.36 (Osaka 2023)
Yaser Bagharab (Qatar) - 8:28.57 (Braga 2023)
Bader Ali Al-Amrani (Saudi Arabia) - 8:32.70 (Oordegem 2023)
Ciren Zhaxi (China) - 8:36.99 (Shenyang 2023)
Wesam Alfarsi (Saudi Arabia) - 8:37.31 (Oordegem 2023)

High Jump Qualification: 9:10 a.m., Oct. 2 / Final: 19:00, Oct. 4
Mutaz Essa Barshim (Qatar) - 2.37 m (Oregon World Championships 2022)
Sanghyeok Woo (South Korea) - 2.35 m (Eugene 2023)
Zhen Wang (China) - 2.32 m (Nanjing 2023)
Ryoichi Akamatsu (Japan) - 2.30 m (Tokyo 2023)
Tomohiro Shinno (Japan) - 2.30 m (Osaka 2022)
Tejaswin Shankar (India) - 2.28 m (Kansas 2021)
Sarvesh Kushare (India) - 2.26 m (Bangkok Asian Championships 2023)
Majd Eddin Ghazal (Syria) - 2.26 m (Ostrava 2022)
Chao-Hsuan Fu (Taiwan) - 2.25 m (Taoyuan 2023)

Pole Vault Final: 19:05, Sept. 30
Ernest Obiena (Philippines) - 6.00 m (Bergen 2023)
Jie Yao (China) - 5.82 m (Hangzhou 2023)
Bokai Huang (China) - 5.75 m (Budapest World Championships 2023)
Seito Yamamoto (Japan) - 5.70 m (Nagoya 2022)
Hussain Al Hizam (Saudi Arabia) - 5.70 (Austin 2021)
Patsapong Amsanarng (Thailand) - 5.61 m (Bangkok 2021)

Long Jump Qualification: 9:05 a.m. Sept. 30
Sreeshankar (India) - 8.41 m (Bhubaneshwar 2023)
Yu-Tang Lin (Taiwan) - 8.40 m (Bangkok Asian Championships 2023)
Jianan Wang (China) - 8.36 m (Oregon World Championships 2022)
Anvar Anvarov (Uzbekistan) - 8.22 m (Geneva 2023)
Yuhao Shi (China) - 8.18 m (Shenyang 2023)
Natsuki Yamakawa (Japan) - 8.17 m (Nihon University 2022)
Muhammed Yahiya (India) - 8.15 m (Bhubaneshwar 2022)
Janry Ubas (Philippines) - 8.08 m (Phnom Penh 2023)
Jinsuok Sung (South Korea) - 8.06 m (Jeongseon 2023)
Ming Tai Chan (Hong Kong) - 8.02 m (Bangkok Asian Championships 2023)
Shotaro Shiroyama (Japan) - 8.01 m (Bangkok Asian Championships 2023)
Ho Long Ko (Hong Kong) - 8.01 m (Hong Kong 2023)

Hammer Throw Final: 19:00, Sept. 30
Sukhrob Khodjaev (Uzbekistan) - 77.57 m (Almaty 2021)
Qi Wang (China) - 75.53 m (Kladno 2023)
Ashraf El Seify (Qatar) - 74.51 m (Doha 2021)
Mergen Mammedov (Turkmenistan) - 72.95 m (Ashgabat 2021)
Ryota Kashimura (Japan) - 72.92 m (Shizuoka 2023)
Ywunchul Lee (South Korea) - 72.34 m (Yecheon 2023)
Shota Fukuda (Japan) - 72.01 m (National University Championships 2023)
Mohammed Al Dubaisi (Saudi Arabia) - 70.96 m (Halle 2023)

Javelin Throw Final: 19:05, Oct. 4
Neeraj Chopra (India) - 88.77 m (Budapest World Championships 2023)
Arshad Nadeem (Pakistan) - 87.82 m (Budapest World Championships 2023)
Kishore Jena (India) - 84.77 m (Budapest World Championships 2023)
Roderick Genki Dean (Japan) - 83.15 m (Bangkok Asian Championships 2023)
Haoran Hu (China) - 81.96 m (Shenyang 2023)
Kenji Ogura (Japan) - 81.63 m (Niigata 2021)

20 kmRW Final: 7:00 a.m., Sept. 29
Jun Zhang (China) - 1:17:38 (Taicang 2023)
Yutaro Murayama (Japan) - 1:19:25 (Nomi 2023)
Zhaozhao Wang (China) - 1:19:40 (Huangshan 2023)
Tomohiro Noda (Japan) - 1:19:52 (Kobe 2023)
Vikash Singh (India) - 1:20:05 (Nomi 2023)
Byeongkwang Choe (South Korea) - 1:20:29 (Daegu 2023)

35 kmRW Mixed Relay Final: 7:00 a.m., Oct. 4
Xianghong He (China) - 2:22:55 (Huangshan 2023)
Qin Wang (China) - 2:26:10 (Huangshan 2023)
Hayato Katsuki (Japan) - 2:28:53 (Wajima 2023)
Subaru Ishida (Japan) - 2:30:37 (Takahata 2022)

Marathon Final: 7:00 a.m., Oct. 5
Yohei Ikeda (Japan) - 2:06:53 (Osaka 2023)
Shumi Dechasa (Bahrain) - 2:06:59 (Geneva 2021)
Toshiki Sadakata (Japan) - 2:07:24 (Osaka 2023)
Jie He (China) - 2:07:30 (Wuxi 2023)
Shaohui Yang (China) - 2:07:49 (Wuxi 2023)
Olonbayar Jamsran (Mongolia) - 2:08:58 (Osaka 2023)
Minho Park (South Korea) - 2:10:13 (Seoul 2023)
Gantulga Dambadarjaa (Mongolia) - 2:11:18 (Seoul 2022)
Jungsub Shim (South Korea) - 2:11:24 (Yecheon 2021)
Ilryong Han (North Korea) - 2:11:37 (Beijing 2019)

Decathlon Day 1: 9:00 a.m., Oct. 2 / Day 2: 9:00 a.m., Oct. 3
Qihao Sun (China) - 7852 (Shenyang 2023)
Yuma Maruyama (Japan) - 7844 (Budapest World Championships 2023)
Shun Taue (Japan) - 7764 (Kagoshima 2021)
Tejaswin Shankar (India) - 7648 (Tucson 2023)
Suttisak Singkhon (Thailand) - 7626 (Bangkok Asian Championships 2023)
Chen-Yu Wang (Taiwan) - 7523 (Tainan 2021)

4x100 m Relay Heats: 9:20, Oct. 2 / Final: 21:25 Oct. 3
Japan - 37.71 (Budapest World Championships 2023)
China - 37.79 (Tokyo Olympics 2021)
Thailand - 38.55 (Bangkok Asian Championships 2023)
Taiwan - 38.86 (Chengdu 2023)
South Korea - 38.90 (Kyoto 2023)

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Yamagata Breaks 100 m U20 NR, Yanagita 9.97 at National University Individual Championships

At the high school, university and corporate league levels, national championships on the track are at an odd time in the Japanese calendar. After regional championships in May, college students and corporate leaguers don't have their national championship meets until September right after summer mileage base building for ekiden season. High schoolers have their regional meets in June, then their Nationals in August. The National University Track and Field Individual Championships , aka the All Japan University Track & Field Challenge Meeting, happens more when you'd expect, ever mid-June in Kanagawa, but without a team component, no relays, no team scoring, and missing a few events, it's not a major event and doesn't usually bring in much of the main collegiate talent. Two weeks out from the outright National Championships, this year was an exception at the Individual Championships with seven new meet records. The biggest out of them was in Saturday's women'

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National Track and Field Championships Entry Lists

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