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Kawauchi Joins Elite Club of 11+ Sub-2:10 Marathoners

by Brett Larner

With his 2:09:54 at Sunday's Ehime Marathon Yuki Kawauchi (Saitama Pref. Gov't) became the fifteenth runner in history to run sub-2:10 eleven times or more in his career.  The achievement puts him in distinguished company, including two marathon world record setters, seven Olympic marathon medalists, seven World Championships marathon medalists, three World Marathon Majors champions and eight winners of the six races now making up the World Marathon Majors.

Kawauchi is one of only three non-African athletes to make the list, one of four on the list without either an Olympic or World Championships medal or a win at one of the Big Six, one of four to have not broken 2:07, and, with a PB of 2:08:14, the only one who has not run sub-2:08.  A sub-2:08 PB and a World Championships medal remain the major goals of his career.

Tsegaye Kebede (Ethiopia) - 16 times sub-2:10
  • PB: 2:04:38
  • 2013 World Marathon Majors champion
  • 1st, 2013 London Marathon
  • 1st, 2012 Chicago Marathon
  • 1st, 2010 London Marathon
  • bronze, 2009 Berlin World Championships
  • bronze, 2008 Beijing Olympic Games

Emmanuel Mutai (Kenya) - 14 times sub-2:10
  • PB: 2:03:14
  • 2011 World Marathon Majors champion
  • 1st, 2011 London Marathon
  • silver, 2009 Berlin World Championships

Jaouad Gharib (Morocco) - 14 times sub-2:10
  • PB: 2:05:27
  • silver, 2008 Beijing Olympic Games
  • gold, 2005 Helsinki World Championships
  • gold, 2003 Paris World Championships

Yemane Tsegay (Ethiopia) - 13 times sub-2:10
  • PB: 2:04:48
  • silver, 2015 Beijing World Championships

Feyisa Lelisa (Ethiopia) - 13 times sub-2:10
  • PB: 2:04:52
  • silver, 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympic Games
  • 1st, 2016 Tokyo Marathon
  • bronze, 2011 Daegu World Championships

Abdelkader El Mouaziz (Morocco) - 13 times sub-2:10
  • PB: 2:06:46
  • 1st, 2001 London Marathon
  • 1st, 2000 New York City Marathon
  • 1st, 1999 London Marathon

Stefano Baldini (Italy) - 13 times sub-2:10
  • PB: 2:07:22
  • gold, 2006 Goteborg European Championships
  • gold, 2004 Athens Olympic Games
  • bronze, 2003 Paris World Championships
  • bronze, 2001 Edmonton World Championships
  • gold, 1998 Budapest European Championships

Wilson Kipsang (Kenya) - 12 times sub-2:10
  • PB: 2:03:13
  • world record setter
  • 2014 World Marathon Majors champion
  • 1st, 2014 New York City Marathon
  • 1st, 2014 London Marathon
  • 1st, 2013 Berlin Marathon
  • bronze, 2012 London Olympic Games
  • 1st, 2012 London Marathon

Haile Gebrselassie (Ethiopia) - 12 times sub-2:10
  • PB: 2:03:59
  • 2-time world record setter
  • 1st, 2009 Berlin Marathon
  • 1st, 2008 Berlin Marathon
  • 1st, 2007 Berlin Marathon
  • 1st, 2006 Berlin Marathon

Sammy Korir (Kenya) - 12 times sub-2:10
  • PB: 2:04:56

Bernard Kiprop (Kenya) - 12 times sub-2:10
  • PB: 2:06:19

Abel Kirui (Kenya) - 11 times sub-2:10
  • PB: 2:05:04
  • 1st, 2016 Chicago Marathon
  • silver, 2012 London Olympic Games
  • gold, 2011 Daegu World Championships
  • gold, 2009 Berlin World Championships

Benson Barus (Kenya) - 11 times sub-2:10
  • PB: 2:07:07

Bong-ju Lee (South Korea) - 11 times sub-2:10
  • PB: 2:07:20
  • gold, 2002 Busan Asian Games
  • 1st, 2001 Boston Marathon
  • gold, 1998 Bangkok Asian Games
  • silver, 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games

Yuki Kawauchi (Japan) - 11 times sub-2:10
  • PB: 2:08:14
  • bronze, 2014 Incheon Asian Games

© 2017 Brett Larner
all rights reserved

Comments

Brett Larner said…
Additions and corrections welcome.
Ange said…
So who was the youngest I am wondering...
TokyoRacer said…
Thanks, very interesting. Uh, Benson Barus?
Brett Larner said…
Yes, Benson made the list too.

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