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Major Earthquake and Tsunami Hit Sendai and East Coast of Japan (updated)



http://edition.cnn.com/
http://www.boingboing.net/2011/03/11/japan-sendai-quake-a.html

Update 3/12/11 a.m.:
More pics:
http://www.boingboing.net/2011/03/11/from-the-sky-aerial.html
The train we were stuck on was on the tracks to the right in the last picture in the above sequence immediately below that scene of the people evacuating.

Update: Shocking gallery of photos here. The pictures from the tsunami hitting Hitachinaka are of Mika's hometown where her parents still live.

Update:
Use Keyhole TV to follow live Japanese coverage of the Sendai earthquake, now being called the worst to ever hit Japan, and tsunami. Use password NHK to follow NHK's coverage.


Mika and I just got home after walking 15 km across Tokyo after being stuck on a train down by the waterfront for an hour. Part of a building next to our train came down right at the beginning of the earthquake and shortly after we were evacuated an oil refinery across the bay exploded big enough to see the flash. We haven't been able to get in touch yet with Mika's parents who live near the coast further up north. Our thoughts go out to all our friends in Sendai and the surrounding area.

Comments

Brett Larner said…
And to Jason Mayeroff, whoever you think you are, you are a fucking degenerate to send me a message like that at a time like this.
Brett Larner said…
Thanks for all the messages. We've had constant aftershocks, but the biggest one just hit. Mika's dad just emailed and said they are OK but that their house had enough damage that they're going to sleep in their car tonight. They're far enough from the water that they don't think the tsunami will affect them.
Simon said…
Brett - good to know that you and those close are safe. Best wishes in difficult times.
Scott Brown said…
Take care Brett!

All the best to our friends in Tokyo!

And especially to those that felt the worst of it in Sendai, which I think is one of the best cities in Japan.

Don't worry about the trolls the stupidity they show at "times like this" only stems from their own sense of fear, their weakness manifests itself in forms like you unfortunately have seen.
Brett Larner said…
Thanks Simon, and I hope all's OK down your way Scott.
Anonymous said…
Hope everyone is safe and sound. Take care of yourselves.
Christian said…
glad to read that you're alright. hope the same holds true for Mika's parents! I was in Sendai almost exactly one year ago... take care!
Anonymous said…
brett,
Wish you and everyone down there all the luck.
I know someone in nishikasai and am wondering what is it looking like for that area. Is there a tsunami danger there

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