Skip to main content

Three Ways for Runners to Support Japanese Relief Efforts

Along with the first-round efforts from the Red Cross, Salvation Army and other major relief organization, several ways have emerged for runners to help the 370,000 displaced and homeless in Japan's tsunami-stricken northeastern region. As temperatures in the area have fallen below zero their circumstances have drastically worsened. Baseball's Ichiro Suzuki has donated 100 million yen, roughly $1,235,000 USD at current exchange rates, to the Japanese Red Cross, but we can all still do our parts. Please take a moment to do something to help.

Two-time World Championships 400 m hurdles bronze medalist Dai Tamesue is fundraising on behalf of Civic Force, an emergency response team operating in the tsunami-affected area. Click here to support his efforts.

Marathon Talk has organized Run for Japan, a worldwide effort for people to dedicate one of their runs to supporting Japan via the British Red Cross. Click here to visit their site.

Namban Rengo, a Tokyo-based international running club, is organizing the Tohoku Disaster Relief Fund Run/Walk on Mar. 19 at 3:00 p.m. at Tokyo's Jingu Gaien running oval near the National Stadium. Click here to sign up and to get more info.

Lastly, while not directly running-related, the Second Harvest food bank is a worthy cause collecting imperishable food and day-to-day necessities to provide to victims. Click here for more information.

Thank you.

Brett & Mika
Japan Running News

Comments

Most-Read This Week

Kawauchi Named Captain of Japanese National Team for London World Championships

At a JAAF event at the British Embassy in Tokyo on July 21, marathoner Yuki Kawauchi (30, Saitama Pref. Gov't) was named men's captain of the Japanese national team for next month's London World Championships. Javelin throw national record holder Yuki Ebihara (Suzuki Hamamatsu AC) was chosen as women's captain.

In a wide-ranging and impassioned speech 4 minutes and 20 seconds long, Kawauchi stoked the team's morale as he told attendees, "I think that there are athletes here today who look at London as just a checkpoint along the way to the Tokyo Olympics. But as a representative of Japan it is not enough just to be there competing. I feel it strongly. You must produce results at this event, the London World Championships. This is the task assigned to each and every one of us. It is critical that we work seriously to achieve our goals. The Japanese people want nothing less. What can we as athletes do for them? More than just wearing the uniform, each of us mus…

Additions to Japanese National Team for London World Championships

The JAAF has made a series of announcements over the last week confirming additions to its small team for next month's London World Championships. Along with previously announced rosters for track and field events, combined events and road events, the following athletes have been added to the Japanese team. Relay members are pending IAAF confirmation. The final complete team roster is expected next week.

Men's 400 m Hurdles
Ryo Kajiki (Josai Univ.) - 49.33
Yusuke Ishida (Waseda Univ.) - 49.35

Men's 3000 m Steeplechase
Hironori Tsuetaki (Fujitsu) - 8:29.05

Men's 4 x 400 m Relay
Yuzo Kanemaru (Otsuka Seiyaku) - 45.76
Kosuke Horii (Sumitomo Denko) - 45.88

Women's Javelin Throw
Yuki Ebihara (Suzuki Hamamatsu AC) - 61.95 m

© 2017 Brett Larner, all rights reserved

'$500,000 USD Prized Asian Premier Marathon Series 2017-18 Launched in Beijing'

http://athleticsasia.org/index.php/k2-component/143-500-000-usd-prized-asian-premier-marathon-series-2017-18-launched-in-beijing

A very interesting World Marathon Majors-style development with prize money only for Asian athletes. Equally interesting is the absence of a Japanese race in the series. Japanese marathoners would dominate the series if they ran its three component races, their only real current competition in Asia coming from East African-born Bahraini athletes.