Skip to main content

Matsunaga and Nakatani Score Bronze - World University Games Day Two Japanese Results

by Brett Larner

Daisuke Matsunaga (Toyo Univ.) became the first Japanese athletics medalist of the 2015 Gwangju World University Games on day two of competition, winning bronze in the men's 20 km in 1:22:06 after falling just over 30 seconds off a close race between eventual gold medalist Dane Bird-Smith (Australia) and Benjamin Thorne (Canada).

12 hours later, Keisuke Nakatani (Komazawa Univ.) repeated the feat in the final track final of the day, winning bronze in the men's 10000 m in 29:19.30 four seconds back from gold medalist Igor Maximov (Russia) and just losing out to Nicolae-Alexandru Soare (Romania) for silver.  After winning the 5000 m and 10000 m at May's Kanto Regional University Track and Field Championships and running a 28:31.84 best for 10000 m and winning the 3000 mSC national title in June, Hironori Tsuetaki (Chuo Gakuin Univ.) had a rare off day, finishing 9th in just 29:52.91.

Sprinter Anna Doi (Daito Bunka Univ.) made it to the women's 200 m semifinals before lining up for the 100 m final where she was 7th in 11.70.  Takamasa Kitagawa (Juntendo Univ.) made it though to the men's 400 m final, just, but teammate Kentaro Sato (Josai Univ.) was left behind in the semis.  Also making the finals in the women's 5000 m were Natsuki Omori (Ritsumeikan Univ.) and, doubling from the 10000 m a day earlier, Rina Koeda (Daito Bunka Univ.).  Kotaro Taniguchi (Chuo Univ.) and Takuya Nagata (Hosei Univ.) both qualified for the men's 200 m semifinals, Taniguchi winning his opening heat in 20.90 and Nagata taking his quarterfinal in 21.04.  In the men's 100 m Yuki Koike (Keio Univ.) was eliminated in the semifinals despite a 10.35 season best.

World University Games Day Two Japanese Results
Gwangju, South Korea, July 9, 2015
click here for complete results

Men's 10000 m Final
1. Igor Maximov (Russia) - 29:15.30
2. Nicolae-Alexandru Soare (Romania) - 29:18.71
3. Keisuke Nakatani (Japan) - 29:19.30
4. Vladimir Nikitin (Russia) - 29:20.20
5. Soufiane Bouchikhi (Belgium) - 29:24.21
-----
9. Hironori Tsuetaki (Japan) - 29:52.91
12. Kazuto Kawabata (Japan) - 30:06.42

Women's 5000 m Heat 1
1. Kristia Maki (Czech Republic) - 16:18.10 - Q
2. Daria Maslova (Kyrgyzstan) - 16:18.40 - Q
3. Jennifer Wenth (Austria) - 16:18.58 - Q
4. Natsuki Omori (Japan) - 16:18.99 - Q
5. Elif Karabulut (Turkey) - 16:21.94 - Q

Women's 5000 m Heat 2
1. Camille Buscomb (New Zealand) - 16:33.77 - Q
2. Rina Koeda (Japan) - 16:34.25 - Q
3. Sara Sutherland (U.S.A.) - 16:34.49 - Q
4. Rachel Cliff (Canada) - 16:36.87 - Q
5. Paulina Kaczynska (Poland) - 16:36.94 - Q

Men's 400 m Semifinal 1
1. Leaname Maotoanong (Botswana) - 45.77 - Q
2. Jan Tesar (Czech Republic) - 45.98 - Q
3. Takamasa Kitagawa (Japan) - 46.25 - q

Men's 400 m Semifinal 2
1. Luguelin Miguel Santos Aquino (Dominican Republic) - 46.01 - Q
2. Sakaria Kamberuka (Botswana) - 46.14 - Q
3. Kentaro Sato (Japan) - 46.36

Women's 200 m Heat 3 -0.8 m/s
1. Giulia Riva (Italy) - 23.99 - Q
2. Hanne Claes (Belgium) - 23.99 - Q
3. Omolara Grace Omotoso (Nigeria) - 24.45 - Q
4. Anna Doi (Japan) - 24.57 - q

Men's 200 m Heat 1 +1.6 m/s
1. Kotaro Taniguchi (Japan) - 20.90 - Q
2. David Gerson Semedo Neves Lima (Portugal) - 21.04 - Q
3. Leonel Bonon (Dominican Republic) - 21.82 - Q

Men's 200 m Heat 7 -0.1 m/s
1. Mobolade Abimbola Ajomale (Canada) - 21.13 - Q
2. Takuya Nagata (Japan) - 21.25 - Q
3. Andrew James McCabe (Australia) - 21.33 - Q

Men's 200 m Quarterfinal 2 -1.5 m/s
1. Viacheslav Kolesnichenko (Russia) - 21.01 - Q
2. Kotaro Taniguchi (Japan) - 21.09 - Q
3. Leon Powell (U.S.A.) - 21.20 - Q

Men's 200 m Quarterfinal 4 +0.4 m/s
1. Takuya Nagata (Japan) - 21.04 - Q
2. Mobolade Abimbola Ajomale (Canada) - 21.13 - Q
3. Chun-Han Yang (Taiwan) - 21.16 - Q

Women's 100 m Semifinal 3 +1.8 m/s
1. Viktoriya Zyabkina (Kazakhstan) - 11.27 - Q
2. Lina Grincikaite-Samuole (Lithuania) - 11.46 - Q
3. Alexandra Bezekova (Slovakia) - 11.56 - q
4. Anna Doi (Japan) - 11.61 - q

Women's 100 m Final +0.4 m/s
1. Viktoriya Zyabkina (Kazakhstan) - 11.23
2. Shimarya Crystal Williams (Jamaica) - 11.46
3. Elena Kozlova (Russia) - 11.47
-----
7. Anna Doi (Japan) - 11.70

Men's 100 m Semifinal 1 +1.8 m/s
1. Ronald Baker (U.S.A.) - 10.14 - Q
2. Kukyoung Kim (South Korea) - 10.16 - Q
3. Yang Yang (China) - 10.24 - Q
4. Jin Su Jung (Australia) - 10.28 - Q
5. Yuki Koike (Japan) - 10.35

Men's 20 km Race Walk Final
1. Dane Bird-Smith (Australia) - 1:21:30
2. Benjamin Thorne (Canada) - 1:21:33
3. Daisuke Matsunaga (Japan) - 1:22:06
-----
8. Tomohiro Noda (Japan) - 1:25:36

(c) 2015 Brett Larner
all rights reserved

Comments

Most-Read This Week

How it Happened

Ancient History I went to Wesleyan University, where the legend of four-time Boston Marathon champ and Wes alum Bill Rodgers hung heavy over the cross-country team. Inspired by Koichi Morishita and Young-Cho Hwang’s duel at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics I ran my first marathon in 1993, qualifying for Boston ’94 where Bill was kind enough to sign a star-struck 20-year-old me’s bib number at the expo.

Three years later I moved to Japan for grad school, and through a long string of coincidences I came across a teenaged kid named Yuki Kawauchi down at my neighborhood track. I never imagined he’d become what he is, but right from the start there was just something different about him. After his 2:08:37 breakthrough at the 2011 Tokyo Marathon he called me up and asked me to help him get into races abroad. He’d finished 3rd on the brutal downhill Sixth Stage at the Hakone Ekiden, and given how he’d run the hills in the last 6 km at Tokyo ’11 I thought he’d do well at Boston or New York. “If M…

Kawauchi Breaks Nobeyama Ultra Course Record

2018 Boston Marathon winner Yuki Kawauchi (Saitama Pref. Gov’t) won the longest race of his career to date Sunday in Nagano, taking over six minutes off the Yatsugatake Nobeyama Kogen 71 km Ultramarathon in 4:41:55.

A training run for next month’s Stockholm Marathon, Kawauchi set off solo at a steady pace around 3:45/km. Climbing from 1355 m to 1908 m as he approached 20 km he naturally slowed, but with over 1000 m of descent over the next 30 km he was soon back on track. Hitting the marathon split around 2:39, he was so far ahead of the 2nd placer that the announcer initially forget Kawauchi had already gone by and announced the next runner as the leader.

At 58 km Kawauchi was on track to clear 4:30:00, but hitting the uphills in the final 10 km and feeling the effects of the unfamiliar distance he slowed to almost 5:00/km. But with so much leeway to work with there was never any danger of the 4:48:13 course record slipping out of reach. Kawauchi stopped the clock in 4:41:55, please…

Late-Bloomer Hiroko Yoshitomi Dropping One Course Record After Another

There’s a woman in her 30s who has been breaking marathon course records left and right. A native of Saga, her name is Hiroko Yoshitomi (34, Memolead). In the last year she has broken course records at three domestic marathons including a 2:33:57 at March’s Saga Sakura Marathon. “In terms of my age, I’ve still got years left to be breaking records,” Yoshitomi says. “If you approach your running in terms of that kind of thinking then it’s totally natural that the times are going to come.” At one point she had thought about retiring this season, but for now she’s determined to push on.

Tokyo-based running Industry conglomerate Rbies recently launched the Marathon Challenge Cup (MCC) series, a grouping of 33 domestic marathons across the country. In the 2017 season 19 of those member races saw a total of 23 new course records. The only person to set multiple new course records was Yoshitomi. Along with these records, at December’s Honolulu Marathon, February’s Tokyo Marathon and April’s…