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Masuno Wins Hurdles Bronze - World University Games Day Four Japanese Results

by Brett Larner
video by naoki620



Hurdler Genta Masuno (Kokusai Budo Univ.) became the third Japanese medalist in athletics at the Gwangju World University Games, taking bronze in the men's 110 mH final.  After a decently quick start Masuno lost ground to eventual gold and silver medalists Greggmar Swift (Barbados) and Konstantin Shabanov (Russia), but with a solid kick after the final hurdle he was strong enough to hang on to 3rd as he made the podium in 13.69 by a margin of just 0.03 seconds.

No such luck in the day's distance final, the women's 5000 m, where favorites Natsuki Omori (Ritsumeikan Univ.) and Rina Koeda (Daito Bunka Univ.) sat through a slow first 4000 m that saw almost the entire field wait it out for a sprint finish over the last 1000 m.  Kristina Maki (Czech Republic) had the gear to find gold, running 2:55.32 for the final km, with the top 8 all finishing within less than 7 seconds of her.  Omori and Koeda were on the losing end of the group, taking 7th and 8th respectively.

In other events, men's long jumper Yasuhiro Moro (Juntendo Univ.) and the men's 4x400 m and 4x100 m all qualified for the finals, the men's 4x100 m squad leading all three heats in a solid 38.93 season best.

World University Games Day Four Japanese Results
Gwangju, South Korea, July 11, 2015
click here for complete results

Women's 5000 m Final
1. Kristina Maki (Czech Republic) - 16:03.29
2. Camille Buscomb (New Zealand) - 16:03.72
3. Daria Maslova (Kyrgyzstan) - 16:04.09
4. Paulina Kaczynska (Poland) - 16:05.81
5. Sara Sutherland (U.S.A.) - 16:06.94
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7. Natsuki Omori (Japan) - 16:07.57
8. Rina Koeda (Japan) - 16:09.92

Men's 4x400 m Relay Heat 1
1. South Africa - 3:04.79 - Q
2. Japan - 3:04:83 - Q
3. Botswana - 3:09.96 - q

Men's 4x100 m Relay Heat 1
1. Japan - 38.93 - Q
2. Thailand - 39.29 - Q
3. Ghana - 39.99

Men's 110 mH Final - +0.7 m/s
1. Greggmar Swift (Barbados) - 13.43
2. Konstantin Shabanov (Russia) - 13.57
3. Genta Masuno (Japan) - 13.69

Men's Long Jump Qualification Group A
1. Vasilii Kopeikin (Russia) - 7.72 m +0.2 m/s - q
2. Bruno Filipe Leite Da Costa (Portugal) - 7.67 m +0.0 m/s - q
3. Cedric Nolf (Belgium) - 7.66 m +0.0 m/s - q
4. Hung-Min Lin (Taiwan) - 7.63 m -1.2 m/s - q
5. Yasuhiro Moro (Japan) - 7.56 m -0.2 m/s - q

Men's Long Jump Qualification Group B
1. Ted Hooper (Taiwan) - 7.90 m +0.3 m/s - Q
2. Ming Tai Chan (Hong Kong) - 7.79 m +0.3 m/s - q
3. Pavel Shalin (Russia) - 7.72 m -0.3 m/s - q
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8. Tomoya Takamasa (Japan) - 7.39 m -0.2 m/s

(c) 2015 Brett Larner
all rights reserved

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