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Shiojiri Scores Men's 10000 m Bronze - Taipei Universiade Athletics Day Two Japanese Results



Following up on Ai Hosoda's bronze medal in the Taipei 2017 Summer Universiade women's 10000 m yesterday, Rio Olympian Kazuya Shiojiri capped the second day of athletics competition with 10000 m bronze of his own.

Always near the front, Shiojiri helped shape the lead quartet that included defending silver medalist Nicolae Soare (Romania) and Ugandans Sadic Bahati and John Kateregga. All four took turns leading at a steady pace between 2:53 and 2:54/km before Kateregga fell off in the second half. Shiojiri lost a few meters to a short surge by Soare near 7000 m and, although he didn't lose ground, couldn't quite regain his footing. By the time the last duel between Bahati and Soare started Shiojiri was out of range, settling for bronze. Both of the lead pair clocked new PBs despite the humid conditions, Bahati scoring gold in 29:08.68 and Soare silver again in 29:12.76. Shiojiri rolled in 8 seconds back in 29:20.96 to take Japan's second medal of the Games.


One of its other main medal hopes couldn't quite pull through. Leading the men's 100 m field after the quarterfinals, Shuhei Tada showed signs of a long season capped by 4x100 m bronze at the London World Championships a few weeks back, taking only 3rd in his semifinal and 7th in the final. Local boy Chun-Han Yang (Taiwan) brought some excitement for the home crowd, breaking his own national record to win his semifinal in 10.20 (0.0 m/s) and then tying his old NR in 10.22 (-0.9 m/s) to take the gold medal in the final. Crowds in the stands were weeping with joy, and you can be sure that there will be more of them for the four days still to come.


Japan's other finalist of the day, collegiate men's hammer throw champ Kunihiro Sumi, finished 13th with a throw of 64.00 m. In qualifying rounds, Ryo Kajiki advanced past the heats in the men's 400 m hurdles, Kenji Ogura doing the same in the men's javelin qualifying round. Takuto Kominami missed out on joining Ogura in the final, finishing only 9th in his qualifying group with a throw of 70.43 m.

Taipei 2017 Summer Universiade Day Two Japanese Results

Taipei, Taiwan, 8/24/17
click here for complete results

Men's 100 m Final (-0.9 m/s)
1. Chun-Han Yang (Taiwan) - 10.22
2. Thando Roto (South Africa) - 10.24
3. Cameron Burrell (U.S.A.) - 10.27
-----
7. Shuhei Tada (Japan) - 10.33

Men's 10000 m Final
1. Sadic Bahati (Uganda) - 29:08.68 - PB
2. Nicolae Soare (Romania) - 29:12.76 - PB
3. Kazuya Shiojiri (Japan) - 29:20.96
-----
DNS - Takuto Suzuki (Japan)

Men's Hammer Throw Final
1. Pawel Fajdek (Poland) - 79.16 m
2. Pavel Bareisha (Belarus) - 77.98 m
3. Serghei Marghiev (Moldova) - 74.98 m
-----
13. Kunihiro Sumi (Japan) - 64.00 m

Men's 100 m Semifinal One (0.0 m/s)
1. Chun-Han Yang (Taiwan) - 10.20 - Q, NR
2. Emmanuel Yeboah (Ghana) - 10.26 - Q
3. Shuhei Tada (Japan) - 10.27 - Q

Men's 400 m Hurdles Heat Four
1. Jacob Paul (Great Britain) - 51.38 - Q
2. Ryo Kajiki (Japan) - 51.73 - Q
3. Saber Boukmouche (Algeria) - 51.88 - Q

Men's Javelin Throw Qualification Group A
1. Chao-Tsun Cheng (Taiwan) - 81.54 m - Q
2. Andrian Mardare (Moldova) - 77.69 m - Q
3. Marcin Krukowski (Poland) - 77.28 m - Q
-----
4. Kenji Ogura (Japan) - 76.13 m - Q

Men's Javelin Throw Qualification Group B
1. Andreas Hofmann (Germany) - 83.51 m - Q
2. Shih-Feng Huang (Taiwan) - 77.78 m - Q
3. Norbert Rivasz-Toth (Hungary) - 75.75 m - q
-----
9. Takuto Kominami (Japan) - 70.43 m

© 2017 Brett Larner, all rights reserved

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