Skip to main content

Nagoya Women's Marathon Elite Field

by Brett Larner

The Nagoya Women's Marathon continues on in its new format as the world's largest women-only marathon, having added a mass-participation field to its longstanding small elite race to stay relevant in the booming Japanese amateur marathon market.  This year sports one of the better elite fields in Nagoya history, with five sub-2:24 women, a solid sub-2:30 second pack, and a small group of noteworthy first-timers.

The #1 seed is Russian Mariya Konovalova with a best of 2:22:46 Chicago 2013, and it looks pretty clear that she and Kenyan trio Helena Kirop, Agnes Kiprop and Agnes Barsosio are there to pull Moscow World Championships 4th-placer Ryoko Kizaki (Team Daihatsu) along to something better than her 2:23:34 winning time from last year. There's a gap back to the next group at the 2:25-2:27 level, where Jelena Prokopcuka (Latvia), the eyebrow-raising Zivile Balciunaite (Lithuania), Miranda Boonstra (Netherlands) and Ashete Dido (Ethiopia) are ideally positioned for the rest of the Japanese women, of whom Asami Kato (Team Panasonic) has the best chance of making a breakthrough.

Most promising among the first-timers is two-time National Corporate Half Marathon champion Tomomi Tanaka (Team Daiichi Seimei), a former teammate of retired Berlin World Championships silver medalist Yoshimi Ozaki and coached by Tokyo World Championships silver medalist Sachiko Yamashita, but her training partner Sakiko Matsumi (Team Daiichi Seimei) also has quality half marathon credentials behind her and, working together, the pair could be a threat from the start.  Yuko Mizuguchi (Team Denso) has weaker half marathon credentials, but a solid 1:43:46 win at last year's Kumanichi 30 km suggests she has the skills to handle longer distances.

Nagoya also features a half marathon open to both men and women as part of its mass-participation component.  Sure to be missed in most coverage of the race will be the presence of Yuki Kawauchi (Saitama Pref. Gov't), who won a place in Nagoya by entering online like the rest of the amateur field.  Kawauchi will run Nagoya just a week after his serious shot at running 2:07 at the Lake Biwa Mainichi Marathon.

The Nagoya Women's Marathon will be broadcast live nationwide.  Check back closer to race date for details on live coverage options.

2014 Nagoya Women's Marathon
Nagoya, 3/9/14
click here for detailed field listing

Mariya Konovalova (Russia) - 2:22:46 (Chicago 2013)
Jelena Prokopcuka (Latvia) - 2:22:56 (Osaka Women's 2005)
Ryoko Kizaki (Japan/Team Daihatsu) - 2:23:34 (Nagoya Women's 2013)
Helena Kirop (Kenya) - 2:23:37 (Venice 2011)
Agnes Kiprop (Kenya) - 2:23:54 (Frankfurt 2011)
Agnes Barsosio (Kenya) - 2:24:03 (Daegu 2013)
Zivile Balciunaite (Lithuania) - 2:25:15 (Tokyo Women's 2005)
Eri Hayakawa (Japan/Team Toto) - 2:26:17 (Nagoya Women's 2013)
Yoko Miyauchi (Japan/Team Kyocera) - 2:26:23 (Nagoya Women's 2012)
Miranda Boonstra (Netherlands) - 2:27:32 (Rotterdam 2012)
Ashete Dido (Ethiopia) - 2:27:47 (Kosice 2013)
Mayumi Fujita (Japan/Team Juhachi Ginko) - 2:29:02 (Yokohama Women's 2012)
Asami Kato (Japan/Team Panasonic) - 2:30:26 (Nagoya Women's 2013)
Misato Horie (Japan/Team Noritz) - 2:30:52 (Nagoya Women's 2013)
Jessica Trengove (Australia) - 2:31:02 (Nagoya Women's 2012)
Korei Omata (Japan/Team Sekisui Kagaku) - 2:31:13 (Nagoya Women's 2012)

Debut
Tomomi Tanaka (Japan/Team Daiichi Seimei) - 1:09:24 (National Corporate Half 2014)
Sakiko Matsumi (Japan/Team Daiichi Seimei) - 1:10:10 (Marugame Half 2013)
Kumi Ogura (Japan/Team Toto) - 1:10:51 (Marugame Half 2013)
Yuka Hakoyama (Japan/Team Wacoal) - 1:11:29 (Marugame Half 2013)
Yuko Mizuguchi (Japan/Team Denso) - 1:13:27 (Matsue Women's Half 2008)

(c) 2014 Brett Larner
all rights reserved

Comments

Most-Read This Week

Kusu Runs Steeplechase World-Leading Time, Yabuta and Yoshimura Break National Records, Tanaka Just Misses Fukushi's NR - Kitami and Liege Highlights

Wednesday afternoon and evening saw the fourth meet in this year's five-part Hokuren Distance Challenge series, this time in the town of Kitami. The program included the little-raced 2000 m steeplechase as a tuneup for Monday's series-closing Abashiri meet, and in both the women's and men's races the national records went down. A top collegiate steepler while at Kyoto Sangyo University, Yui Yabuta (Otsuka Seiyaku) ran 6:27.74 to break the women's record. In the men's race 1500 m specialist Yasunari Kusu (Ami AC) surprised many by breaking the Japanese national record with a world-leading 5:31.82 despite little experience in the steeple.

The women's 3000 m in Kitami was more explicitly set up as a national record attempt, with four of the ten fastest Japanese women ever over the distance lined up to gun for the great Kayoko Fukushi's 8:44.40 record dating back to 2002. From the gun it was out at NR pace, with pacers Hellen Ekalale (Toyota Jidoshokki) an…

Lemeteki and Aoki Win Shibestu Half

Kenyan Razini Lemeteki (Takushoku Univ.) and relative unknown Nanami Aoki (Iwatani Sangyo) took the top spots in hot and sunny conditions at the Shibetsu Half Marathon in Hokkaido. With Kenta Murayama (Asahi Kasei) doing early frontrunning in the men's race only to fade to a 20th-place finish in 1:06:40 Lemeteki had little competition for the win in 1:03:25. 2017 Shibetsu winner Tsubasa Hayakawa (Toyota) was the top Japanese man at 2nd in 1:03:42, beating MGC Race Olympic marathon trials qualifiers Daichi Kamino (New Balance) and Naoki Okamoto (Chugoku Denryoku) - by 4 seconds and 11 seconds. Other MGC Race qualifiers Masato Imai (Toyota Jidoshokki), Yuji Iwata (MHPS) and Ryo Kiname (MHPS) all struggled, none of them breaking 66 minutes.

Aoki won the women's race easily in 1:15:12 by almost a minute over Mai Nagaoka (Sysmex). MGC Race qualifiers Reia Iwade (Under Armour) and Keiko Nogami (Juhachi Ginko) were listed to start but apparently did not run.
33rd Suffolkland Shibets…

Japan Tops Universiade Medal Count With 33 Golds

A global celebration of university student sports, the closing ceremonies for 30th anniversary Summer Universiade took place July 14 in Napoli, Italy to bring 12 days of competition across a range of collegiate sports. Japanese athletes took part in all 15 categories of competition, winning a total of 33 gold medals to rank #1 worldwide in the medal count standings. Japanese athletes also won 21 silver medals and 28 bronze for a total of 82 medals overall, also ranking #1. Russia scored 82 medals total but had 22 golds, with China 3rd at 22 golds and 43 medals overall. The U.S.A. was 4th.

Just before the start of the closing ceremonies, Japanese delegation leader Ichiro Hoshino gave a positive evaluation of the teams's performance, saying, "I believe that our athletes in each area of competition carried their weight to help achieve this excellent result, and that that will provide momentum in Tokyo 2020." The next Summer Universiade takes place in Chengdu, China in 2021…