Skip to main content

Kumanichi 30 km Road Race Elite Field

http://kumanichi.com/fsports/marathon/2016/kiji/20160116001.xhtml
http://kumanichi.com/fsports/marathon/2016/kiji/20160127001.xhtml

translated and edited by Brett Larner

The organizers of the 5th Kumamoto-jo Marathon have announced the elite field for the Feb. 21 Kanaguri Memorial Kumanichi 30 km Road Race, held alongside the Kumamoto-jo Marathon as its elite race. Celebrating Kumanichi's 60th anniversary running, this year’s elite men’s field features strong young athletes who made an impact on the competitive Third and Fourth Stages at the New Year Ekiden corporate men’s national championships on Jan. 1. With university runners having won Kumanichi the last two years the corporate runners’ battle to get back on top will be one of the main draws this year.

The fresh young corporate league contingent is led by two members of the New Year Ekiden runner-up team Konica Minolta, Masato Kikuchi and Keita Shitara, along with local Chiharadai H.S. graduate Kento Otsu of New Year Ekiden 3rd-placer Toyota Kyushu. Last year Kikuchi ran the third-fastest half marathon ever by a Japanese man, 1:00:32. Shitara finished 4th in Kumanichi three years ago during his third year at Toyo University in a then-university national record 1:29:55. With Shota Hattori (Honda) having led Nittai University to its first Hakone Ekiden win in 30 years three years ago the domination of former Hakone stars in this year’s field is obvious.

At the same time, current Hakone stars are looking to extend their Kumanichi winning streak to three, with Ryo Kuchimachi and Shun Sakuraoka of this year’s Hakone runner-up Toyo leading the way.

Sayo Nomura and Sakiko Matsumi of the Daiichi Seimei corporate team top the women’s field. Kumamoto Chuo H.S. graduate Seika Nishikawa (Sysmex) will be making her 30 km debut on home ground.

One other top-level invited male athlete, Akinobu Murasawa (Nissin Shokuhin) has withdrawn with injury. Along with the invited athletes, 100 corporate and amateur runners including 11 women are entered in the general division. With an eye toward the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, anticipation is high that this year’s race will see the birth of a new star. The race begins at 9:00 a.m.

60th Kumanichi 30 km Road Race Elite Field
Kumamoto, 2/21/16
click here for complete field listing
all times are 2013-2015 half marathon bests except where noted

Men
Hiroki Kadota (Kanebo) – 2:10:46 (Beppu-Oita Mainichi Marathon 2015)
Keita Shitara (Konica Minolta) – 1:29:55 (Kumanichi 30 km 2013)
Masaki Ito (Konica Minolta) - 1:30:21 (Ome 30 km 2013)
Masato Kikuchi (Konica Minolta) – 1:00:32 (Nat’l Corp. Half 2015)
Shota Hattori (Honda) – 1:01:25 (Nat’l Corp. Half 2015)
Tomohiro Shiiya (Toyota Boshoku) – 1:02:15 (Nat’l Corp. Half 2013)
Ryo Matsumoto (Toyota) – 1:02:32 (Nat’l Corp. Half 2013)
Hidehito Takamine (Fujitsu) - 1:02:42 (Marugame Half 2014)
Shun Sakuraoka (Toyo Univ.) – 1:02:53 (Ageo Half 2014)
Shoya Kurokawa (JR Higashi Nihon) - 1:03:22 (Ageo Half 2015)
Daisuke Koyama (Chudenko) – 1:03:22 (Marugame Half 2014)
Ryota Yabushita (Meiji Univ.) - 1:03:23 (Marugame Half 2015)
Ryo Kuchimachi (Toyo Univ.) – 1:03:29 (Ageo Half 2015)
Kento Otsu (Toyota Kyushu) – 1:03:29 (Tamana Half 2015)
Yuko Matsumiya (Hitachi Butsuryu) - 1:03:30 (Marugame Half 2013

Women
Sayo Nomura (Daiichi Seimei) – 1:10:03 (Sanyo Ladies’ Half 2013)
Sakiko Matsumi (Daiichi Seimei) – 1:10:10 (Marugame Half 2013)
Mami Onuki (Sysmex) - 1:11:37 (Matsue Ladies' Half 2015)
Yoko Miyauchi (Hokuren) - 1:12:22 (Sanyo Ladies' 2015)
Sakie Arai (Osaka Gakuin Univ.) – 1:12:57 (Matsue Ladies’ Half 2015)
Seika Nishikawa (Sysmex) – 1:18:28 (Nat’l Corp. Half 2015)

Comments

Most-Read This Week

Men's Marathon Rout - JAAF Executives Announce Resignation

http://www.nikkansports.com/olympic/rio2016/athletics/news/1698472.html

translated by Brett Larner

In the Rio de Janeiro Olympics men's marathon on Aug. 21, Satoru Sasaki (30) was the top Japanese man at 16th in 2:13:57.  Suehiro Ishikawa (36) was 36th, with Hisanori Kitajima (31) placing 94th.

At the end of athletics competition Japan's total was two medals and two top eight finishes, a total exceeding the JAAF's target one medal but falling short of its goal of five top eight finishes.  JAAF strengthening committee chairman Kazunori Asaba (55) announced that he intends to resign his position following the Rio Olympics.  Strengthening committee vice-chairman Katsumi Sakai (56) and director of men's marathoning Takeshi Soh (63) are also expected to join the exodus of resignations.  Japanese athletics will be forced to make a fresh start before the Tokyo Olympics.

Yuta Shitara Breaks Japanese Men's Half Marathon National Record in Berlin Marathon Tuneup at Usti nad Labem Half

A week after his 28:55 at the Birell Prague Grand Prix 10 km and just eight days out from the Berlin Marathon, Yuta Shitara (Honda) made the great leap forward, taking 8 seconds off Atsushi Sato's 2007 half marathon Japanese national record, finishing 8th at the Czech Republic's Usti nad Labem Half Marathon.

Shitara is probably most well-known outside Japan for going through halfway under 62 minutes during his marathon debut at this year's Tokyo Marathon and still ending up with a 2:09:27, but he's been turning heads in Japan since his second year at Toyo University when he broke a stage record at the 2012 Hakone Ekiden and outkicked the U.S.A.'s Dathan Ritzenhein to finish in 1:01:48 at the NYC Half two months later, until this year the fastest time ever by a Japanese man on U.S soil.

Three weeks before Tokyo this year he ran a 1:01:19 PB at the Marugame Half. Many people would call that a solid tuneup three weeks out from a serious marathon, but eight days? In P…

Kawauchi Wins BMW Oslo Marathon in Fastest Time Since 1986

Running his first race of any distance since finishing 9th at last month's London World Championships, Yuki Kawauchi (Saitama Pref. Gov't) won Saturday's BMW Oslo Marathon in the fastest time in Oslo since before he was born.

Pre-race Kawauchi's goal was to take a shot at the 2:12:58 Norwegian all-comers record, the fastest time ever run on Norwegian soil. With a new two-loop course featuring a pair of tough hills interspersed by a flat seaside section on each loop his game plan was to try to run 3:10/km until midway through the second lap, then try to push it on the climb and descent of the last hill to make up whatever seconds he needed.

15 km into the first lap he was 10 seconds ahead of schedule in 47:20 and 90 seconds clear of 2nd place, but the steep hill starting a kilometer later took its toll and by 20 km he was 24 seconds behind.  Over the second lap the strong sunlight and warmer than usual temperatures and the two weeks he took off after London also began …