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Hiramatsu and Oshima Win Silver at 2014 Nanjing Youth Olympics - Day Four Japanese Results

by Brett Larner

The fourth day of athletics competition at the 2014 Youth Olympics in Nanjing, China saw the Games' first round of medal competition.  2014 National High School Champion Kenta Oshima gave Japan its first medal of the day, taking silver in the boys' 100 m in 10.57 (-0.5) just behind winner Sydney Siame of Zambia in 10.56.  2014 high jump National High School Champion Yuji Hiramatsu followed up quickly with a PB jump of 2.14 m, far short of Russian winner Danil Lysenko's jump of 2.20 m but good for another silver medal.

In the girls' 5000 m race walk Sayori Matsumoto came up just short of the medals in 4th in 23:54.71.  Discus throw youth national record holder Yume Ando was also 4th, his throw of 57.36 m undone by a PB 57.48 m throw by Ukrainian Ruslan Valitov.  In the girls' 800 m, 2014 National High School Champion Hina Takahashi was off her game, finishing last in the final in 2:09.96.

Three Japanese athletes will be competing for medals on Sunday.  Nozomi Musembi Takamatsu will be looking to improve on her 4th-place finish in this year's World Junior Championships 3000 m, coming into the 3000 m final with the best PB in the field, 9:02.85.  Minoru Onogawa, 2nd at the 2014 National High School Championships, races the boys' 10000 m race walk, while Jun Yamashita, 3rd in the 2014 National High School Championships, runs the boys' 200 m A final.

2014 Youth Olympics Day Four
Nanjing, China, Aug. 23, 2014
click here for complete results

Women's 800 m A Final
1. Martha Bissah (Ghana) - 2:04.90 - PB
2. Hawi Alemu Negeri (Ethiopia) - 2:06.01 - PB
3. Mareen Kalis (Germany) - 2:06.03
4. Elena Belo (Italy) - 2:06.31 - PB
5. Lotte Scheldeman (Belgium) - 2:07.83
6. Louise Shanahan (Ireland) - 2:08.29 - PB
7. Ekaterina Alekseeva (Russia) - 2:09.21
8. Hina Takahashi (Japan) - 2:09.96

Men's 100 m A Final (-0.5)
1. Sydney Siame (Zambia) - 10.56
2. Kenta Oshima (Japan) - 10.57
3. Trae Williams (Australia) - 10.60
4. Altor Same Ekobo Marama (Spain) - 10.71
5. Meshaal Almutairi (Kuwait) - 10.80
6. Kristoffer Hari (Denmark) - 10.80
7. Josneyber Ramierz (Venezuela) - 10.82
8. Tyler Bower (Bahamas) - 10.96

Women's 5000 m Race Walk
1. Zhenxia Ma (China) - 22:22.08
2. Valeria Ortuno Martinez (Mexico) - 23:19.27
3. Noemi Stella (Italy) - 23:38.10
4. Sayori Matsumoto (Japan) - 23:54.71
5. Athanasia Vaitsi (Greece) - 24:22.21 - PB

Men's High Jump A Final
1. Danil Lysenko (Russia) - 2.20 m
2. Yuji Hiramatsu (Japan) - 2.14 m - PB
3. Shemaiah James (Australia) - 2.14 m - PB
4. Oleksandr Barannikov (Ukraine) - 2.14 m
5. Lushane Wilson (Jamaica) - 2.08 m - PB
6. Igor Franciszek Kopala (Poland) - 2.08 m
7. Hicham Bouhanoun (Algeria) - 2.08 m
8. Jahnhai Perinchief (Bermuda) - 2.00 m

Men's Discus Throw A Final
1. Yulong Cheng (China) - 64.14 m - PB
2. Clemens Prufer (Germany) - 63.52 m
3. Ruslan Valitov (Ukraine) - 57.48 m - PB
4. Yume Ando (Japan) - 57.36 m
5. Mithrava Senthil Kumar (India) - 57.06 m - PB
6. Andrea Thanasis (Greece) - 56.80 m - PB
7. Tyler Merkley (U.S.A.) - 56.27 m
8. Stefan Mura (Moldova) - 49.81 m

(c) 2014 Brett Larner
all rights reserved

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