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2014 Nanjing Youth Olympics - Day One Japanese Results

by Brett Larner

Over half of the small Japanese track and field contingent at the 2014 Youth Olympics saw action on the first day of competition, with over half of those qualifying for the A-level final in their events.  4th in the 3000 m at this year's World Junior Championships, Nozomi Musembi Takamatsu, the daughter of 2001 Nagano Marathon winner Maxwell Musembi, led the way with a time of 9:08.01 for 4th in the girls' 3000 m qualification round, the only runner in the top five not to PB but only 1.14 seconds behind winner Fatuma Chebsi (Bahrain).  2014 National High School champions Hina Takahashi and Yuji Hiramatsu finished 4th in their events' qualifying rounds to both make their A finals, Takahashi quick enough at 2:09.59 in the girls' 800 m and Hiramatsu one of only five athletes to clear 2.10 m in the boys' high jump.  Boys' discus national youth record holder Yume Ando threw 55.87 m for 6th in the qualifying round, good enough to also make the A final.

In the girls' pole vault, Misaki Morota cleared only 3.40 m, missing the A final cutoff and bumped down to the B final.  Also making the B final was 100 m hurdler Nana Fujimori, just 0.03 outside the A final at 13.83 (-0.7).  Nao Kanai had an off day in the boys' 110 m hurdles, well off his PB in 14.03 (+0.4) for the dubious distinction of being the only Japanese athlete of the day to make a C final.  Track and field events at the Youth Olympics continue through August 26.

2014 Youth Olympics Day One
Nanjing, China, 8/20/14
click here for complete results

Women's 3000 m Qualification
1. Fatuma Chebsi (Bahrain) - 9:06.87 - PB
2. Berhan Demiesa Asgedom (Ethiopia) - 9:07.05 - PB
3. Cavaline Nahimana (Burundi) - 9:07.23 - PB
4. Nozomi Musembi Takamatsu (Japan) - 9:08.01
5. Jackline Chepkoech (Kenya) - 9:08.54 - PB
6. Alina Reh (Germany) - 9:08.70
7. Janat Chemusto (Uganda) - 9:10.74 - PB
8. Behafeta Abreha (Azerbaijan) - 9:14.06 - PB
9. Maria Magdalena Ifteni (Romania) - 9:15.00 - PB
10. Gebrekrstos Weldeghabr (Eritrea) - 9:34.73 - PB

Women's 800 m Heat 3
1. Martha Bissah (Ghana) - 2:07.67
2. Hawi Alemu Negeri (Ethiopia) - 2:08.18
3. Ekaterina Alekseeva (Russia) - 2:09.32
4. Hina Takahashi (Japan) - 2:09.59
5. Thandi Uerimuna (Botswana) - 2:11.97 - PB
6. Maryna Duts (Ukraine) - 2:13.76
7. Dhakirina Fatima (Colombia) - 2:28.17
DNF - Delgado J. Espinales (Nicaragua)

Men's 110 m Hurdles Heat 3 +0.4
1. Henrik Hannemann (Germany) - 13.55 - PB
2. Dawid Aaron Zebrowski (Poland) - 13.64
3. Joshuan J. Berrios Mora (Colombia) - 13.66
4. Tavonte Dejour Mott (Bahamas) - 13.86 - PB
5. Nao Kanai (Japan) - 14.03
6. Chi-Hung Cheng (Taiwan) - 14.09
DQ - Mohd Rizzua Muhamad (Malaysia)

Women's 100 m Hurdles Heat 1 -0.7
1. Klaudia Sorok (Hungary) - 13.66
2. Natalia Christofi (Cyprus) - 13.80
3. Rachel Pace (Australia) - 13.83
4. Nana Fujimori (Japan) - 13.83
5. Paolla Ferlin Luchin (Brazil) - 14.32
6. Emanuelle Masse (Canada) - 14.49

Mens' High Jump Qualification
1. Daniel Lysenko (Russia) - 2.10 m
2. Oleksandr Barannikov (Ukraine) - 2.10 m
3. Jahnhai Perinchief (Bermuda) - 2.10 m - PB
4. Yuji Hiramatsu (Japan) - 2.10 m
5. Igor Franciszek Kopala (Poland) - 2.10 m

Women's Pole Vault Qualification
1. Angelica Moser (Switzerland) - 3.80 m
2. Thiziri Daci (France) - 3.70 m
2. Leda Kroselj (Slovenia) - 3.70 m
2. Robeilys Peinado (Venezuela) - 3.70 m
2. Anna Shpak (Belarus) - 3.70 m
-----
11. Misaki Morota (Japan) - 3.40 m

Men's Discus Throw Qualification
1. Yulong Cheng (China) - 59.88 m
2. Clemens Prufer (Germany) - 59.88 m
3. Pavol Zencar (Slovakia) - 59.64 m
4. Ruslan Valitov (Ukraine) - 56.97 m - PB
5. Tyler Merkley (U.S.A.) - 56.61 m - PB
6. Yume Ando (Japan) - 55.87 m

(c) 2014 Brett Larner
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