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Fukushima Examines Bid for 2014 National Championships

http://sankei.jp.msn.com/region/news/120926/fks12092602030000-n1.htm

translated by Brett Larner

Under the leadership of director Toshio Katahira, the Fukushima Prefecture Track and Field Association made a formal request to the prefectural government on Sept. 25 to back a bid to host the 98th National Track and Field Championships in 2014.  Delivering his petition to lieutenant governor Masao Uchibori, Director Katahira told him, "We want to show the whole country that even though we're in a tough situation because of the nuclear disaster, Fukushima is still alive and well."  The lieutenant governor responded, "We have to closely examine to what degree the prefecture can prioritize the Championships as we continue to deal with recovery efforts."

In Olympic and World Championships years the National Championships serve as the selection race for the Japanese national team.  According to Fukushima Prefecture Track and Field Association officials, apart from Tokyo eighteen prefectures have hosted the Championships.  Osaka was the host this year, with the Championships scheduled to return to Tokyo next year.

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Lexicon

Betsudai - the Beppu-Oita Mainichi Marathon
daigaku - university
ekiden - a long-distance relay race
faito - a courseside audience cheer; see ganbatte
ganbatte (ganbare) - a courseside audience cheer; see faito
gasshuku - an intensive training camp
Hakone Ekiden - the annual university men`s championships
jitsugyodan - corporate-sponsored professional running teams
onsen - a hot spring
Q-chan - Naoko Takahashi, the 2000 Sydney Olympics women`s marathon gold medalist, Olympic record holder and first woman to break 2:20 in the marathon
rikujo - track and field, the marathon, and other running events
Rikuren - the JAAF
tasuki - the sash which is handed off during an ekiden
zannen - too bad
otaku - a nerdy, socially awkward person, usually male, who is obsessed with some esoteric topic

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