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Call Him Silva: Natsuki Terada and a Classic Hakone Finish (updated)

Trying to bring Koku Gakuin University home to its first-ever top ten seeded bracket Hakone Ekiden finish in a four-way sprint for the last three seeded spots, with less than 200 m to go on a 23.1 km stage at the end of a 217.9 km race in front of a live TV audience in the tens of millions freshman anchor Natsuki Terada kicks to the front and.....follows the camera truck off the course. Terada's coach Yasuhiro Maeda told reporters afterward, "I thought my eyes were going to pop out of my head." Amazingly, Terada comes back to take the final seeded spot in 10th.

The clip below is from the "Mo Hitotsu no Hakone Ekiden" documentary which aired last weekend. The clip shows coach Maeda following Terada in a car during the last km. I'll try to get time to do a translation of the audio, but it's pretty easy to follow his range of emotions and he is essentially saying what it looks like he is saying all the way through.


Comments

Dusty said…
Do you know of anywhere online where I can find a copy of the entire race? I tried Keyhole TV and it would work for one minute, then stutter, then stop. I want to watch this race so badly!
Brett Larner said…
Dusty--

Sorry to hear Keyhole didn't work out for you. I was in Canada at the time and had the same problem initially. We reloaded the newest version of the player and the streaming improved dramatically, but several thousand people were watching by the last stage on each day and it did get choppy.

As far as the race being available online, no, it's about 14 hours of coverage so I can't imagine it being up for download anywhere. I recorded it, though.
Phil Suh said…
Brett--

Nippon Tele had a couple specials on TV this past Sunday. One was called "もうひとつの箱根駅伝", a one hour special covering some of the behind-the-scenes views of the race.

Evidently they have cameras in the coach's cars -- and of course the best reactions came from Kokugaku University's coach Maeda as he watched his 10th stage runner Terada run off course and then back on. It is absolutely riveting footage.

Did you see it? I recorded it, but I am trying to figure out a way to get it up on Youtube or something now.

P.S. LOVED your coverage of the race. I was down at Shinagawa on Day 2 cheering the racers as they came back through, armed with my 1 seg TV and your twitter feed. Definitely the best Hakone ever.
Phil Suh said…
someone already youtubed it...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a_UNgXYN48w
Brett Larner said…
Phil--

Thanks, glad my Twitter feed was helpful. I did from the wildlands of northern Vancouver Island. Yes, I did see Mo Hitotsu. Always interesting to see some of the inside stories, like Murasawa not knowing how far up he had advanced. Thanks for the link to the Youtube clip as well. If I have time I'll translate the audio for non-Japanese speakers.
Phil S said…
Brett - here's another video w English annotations. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MrKz5QspAuU

Terada's coach cracks me up every time I watch it. I didn't bother trying to translate everything because it really is better just to watch and enjoy what happens.

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