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Japan Hits 100 Men Sub-2:10

At the Feb. 2 Beppu-Oita Mainichi Marathon Japanese men's marathoning hit a landmark as Tsukasa Koyama became the 100th Japanese man to break 2:10. Below are all 100 plus the two who followed him under the 2:10 mark for the first time in Beppu-Oita.


Suguru Osako
2:05:50, Chicago 2018
2:07:19 - Fukuoka 2017

Yuta Shitara
2:06:11, Tokyo 2018
2:07:40, Gold Coast 2019
2:09:03, Berlin 2017
2:09:27, Tokyo 2017

Toshinari Takaoka
2:06:16, Chicago 2002
2:07:41, Tokyo Int'l 2005
2:07:50, Chicago 2004
2:07:59, Fukuoka Int'l 2003
2:09:31, Tokyo Int'l 2006
2:09:41, Fukuoka Int'l 2001

Atsushi Fujita
2:06:51, Fukuoka Int'l 2000
2:09:48, Fukuoka Int'l 2005

Hiroto Inoue
2:06:54, Tokyo 2018
2:08:22, Tokyo 2017

Takayuki Inubushi
2:06:57, Berlin 1999
2:08:16, Tokyo Int'l 2000

Atsushi Sato
2:07:13, Fukuoka Int'l 2007
2:08:36, Biwako 2004
2:08:50, Biwako 2003
2:09:16, London 2009
2:09:50, Biwako 2000

Yuma Hattori
2:07:27, Fukuoka Int'l 2018
2:09:46, Tokyo 2017

Taisuke Kodama
2:07:35, Beijing 1986

Masato Imai
2:07:39, Tokyo 2015
2:09:30, Beppu-Oita 2014

Hiromi Taniguchi
2:07:40, Beijing 1988
2:09:34, Tokyo Int'l 1989
2:09:50, London 1987

Arata Fujiwara
2:07:48, Tokyo 2012
2:08:40, Tokyo 2008
2:09:31, Fukuoka Int'l 2012
2:09:34, Ottawa 2010
2:09:47, Fukuoka Int'l 2008

Shigeru Aburuya
2:07:52, Biwako 2001
2:09:26, Saint-Denis 2003
2:09:30, Tokyo Int'l 2003

Tomoaki Kunichika
2:07:52, Fukuoka Int'l 2003

Toshinari Suwa
2:07:55, Fukuoka Int'l 2003
2:08:52, Fukuoka Int'l 2006
2:09:10, Biwako 2007
2:09:16, Tokyo 2008

Kunimitsu Ito
2:07:57, Beijing 1986
2:09:35, Fukuoka Int'l 1983
2:09:37, Fukuoka Int'l 1981

Taku Fujimoto
2:07:57, Chicago 2018
2:09:36, Fukuoka Int'l 2019

Yoshiteru Morishita
2:07:59, Biwako 2001
2:09:36, Fukuoka Int'l 1999

Kazuhiro Maeda
2:08:00, Tokyo 2013
2:08:38, Tokyo 2012

Hiroshi Miki
2:08:05, Tokyo Int'l 1999
2:09:30, Tokyo Int'l 2000

Toshiyuki Hayata
2:08:07, Fukuoka Int'l 1997

Ryo Kiname
2:08:08, Tokyo 2018

Kohei Matsumura
2:08:09, Tokyo 2014

Masakazu Fujiwara
2:08:12, Biwako 2003
2:08:51, Biwako 2013
2:09:06, Fukuoka Int'l 2014

Yuki Kawauchi
2:08:14, Seoul 2013
2:08:15, Beppu-Oita 2013
2:08:37, Tokyo 2011
2:09:01, Gold Coast 2016
2:09:05, Fukuoka Int'l 2013
2:09:11, Fukuoka Int'l 2016
2:09:15, Hofu 2013
2:09:18, Gold Coast 2017
2:09:21 Lake Biwa, 2019
2:09:36, Hamburg 2014
2:09:46, Hofu 2014
2:09:54, Ehime 2017
2:09:57, Fukuoka Int'l 2011

Takeyuki Nakayama
2:08:15, Hiroshima 1985
2:08:18, Fukuoka Int'l 1987
2:08:21, Seoul 1986
2:08:43, Tokyo Int'l 1986
2:09:12, Beppu-Oita 1991

Shogo Nakamura
2:08:16, Berlin 2018

Tadayuki Ojima
2:08:18, Biwako 2004
2:08:48, Fukuoka Int'l 2003
2:09:10, Fukuoka Int'l 1998

Hiroyuki Horibata
2:08:24, Fukuoka Int'l 2012
2:09:25, Biwako 2011

Toshihiko Seko
2:08:27, Chicago 1986
2:08:38, Tokyo Int'l 1983
2:08:52, Fukuoka Int'l 1983
2:09:26, Boston 1981
2:09:45, Fukuoka Int'l 1980

Koji Shimizu
2:08:28, Biwako 2003
2:09:00, Tokyo Int'l 1999
2:09:28, Fukuoka Int'l 2001
2:09:57, Biwako 1998

Yuya Yoshida
2:08:30, Beppu-Oita 2020

Ryuji Takei
2:08:35, Biwako 2002
2:09:23, Biwako 2000

Kentaro Nakamoto
2:08:35, Beppu-Oita 2013
2:08:53, Biwako 2012
2:09:31, Biwako 2011
2:09:32, Beppu-Oita 2017

Satoshi Osaki
2:08:36, Biwako 2008
2:08:46, Tokyo Int'l 2004
2:09:38, Hofu 2002

Tsuyoshi Ogata
2:08:37, Fukuoka Int'l 2003
2:09:10, Fukuoka Int'l 2004
2:09:15, Fukuoka Int'l 2002

Kenji Yamamoto
2:08:42, Biwako 2019
2:08:48, Tokyo 2018

Muneyuki Ojima
2:08:43, Biwako 1998
2:08:46, Rotterdam 1999
2:09:09, Fukuoka Int'l 1999
2:09:50, Fukuoka Int'l 1998

Ryo Yamamoto
2:08:44, Biwako 2012
2:09:06, Biwako 2013

Takayuki Nishida
2:08:45, Beppu-Oita 2001

Chihiro Miyawaki
2:08:45, Tokyo 2018

Nozomi Saho
2:08:47, Fukuoka Int'l 1997
2:09:23, Rotterdam 1998

Nobuyuki Sato
2:08:48, Fukuoka Int'l 1998

Wataru Okutani
2:08:49, Fukuoka Int'l 2006
2:09:13, Biwako 2005

Kenjiro Jitsui
2:08:50, Tokyo Int'l 1996


Koji Kobayashi
2:08:51, Tokyo 2014
2:09:55, Beppu-Oita 2020

Hideyuki Obinata
2:08:52, Biwako 2001

Koichi Morishita
2:08:53, Beppu-Oita 1991

Tsukasa Koyama
2:08:53, Beppu-Oita 2020

Yuzo Onishi
2:08:54, Biwako 2008

Takeshi Soh
2:08:55, Tokyo Int'l 1983
2:09:17, Fukuoka Int'l 1983
2:09:49, Fukuoka Int'l 1980

Kazutoshi Takatsuka
2:08:56, Biwako 2004

Satoru Sasaki
2:08:56, Fukuoka Int'l 2015
2:09:47, Biwako 2014


Kenta Murayama
2:08:56, Berlin 2019
2:09:50, Gold Coast 2018

Yuki Sato
2:08:58, Tokyo 2018
2:09:18, Berlin 2018

Takuya Noguchi
2:08:59, Gold Coast 2017

Yoshinori Oda
2:09:03, Tokyo 2011

Shinji Kawashima
2:09:04, Biwako 2000

Shigeru Soh
2:09:06, Beppu-Oita 1978
2:09:11, Fukuoka Int'l 1983

Takuya Fukatsu
2:09:06, Beppu-Oita 2020
2:09:31, Biwako 2016

Hirokatsu Kurosaki
2:09:07, Tokyo 2014

Kento Kikutani
2:09:07, Beppu-Oita 2020

Michitaka Hosokawa
2:09:10, Biwako 2005

Suehiro Ishikawa
2:09:10, Biwako 2013
2:09:25, Biwako 2016
2:09:29, Tokyo 2014

Masanori Sakai
2:09:10, Tokyo 2014

Masaki Oya
2:09:11, Rotterdam 1997
2:09:33, Fukuoka Int'l 1995

Akira Shimizu
2:09:11, Beppu-Oita 1998

Tomoyuki Morita
2:09:12, Biwako 2012

Hiroaki Sano
2:09:12, Tokyo 2015

Hiroyuki Yamamoto
2:09:12, Tokyo 2017

Takayuki Matsumiya
2:09:14, Tokyo 2013
2:09:30, Tokyo 2012

Kohei Futaoka
2:09:15, Beppu-Oita 2019

Takashi Horiguchi
2:09:16, Biwako 2012

Hisanori Kitajima
2:09:16, Biwako 2016

Takeshi Hamano
2:09:18, Biwako 2002
2:09:29, Biwako 2003

Yuko Matsumiya
2:09:18, Biwako 2005
2:09:25, Biwako 2004
2:09:40, Fukuoka Int'l 2007

Haruki Minatoya
2:09:19, Beppu-Oita 2020

Koji Gokaya
2:09:21, Tokyo 2015

Toru Mimura
2:09:23, Beppu-Oita 1991

Akira Manai
2:09:23, Biwako 1997

Tomoya Shimizu
2:09:23, Biwako 2008

Satoshi Irifune
2:09:23, Fukuoka Int'l 2008
2:09:40, Tokyo 2008
2:09:58, Beppu-Oita 2005

Noriaki Igarashi
2:09:26, Fukuoka Int'l 2000
2:09:35, Chicago 2001
2:09:38, Fukuoka Int'l 1998

Daisuke Uekado
2:09:27, Fukuoka Int'l 2017

Yukinobu Nakazaki
2:09:28, Tokyo Int'l 2004

Ryo Hashimoto
2:09:29, Beppu-Oita 2019

Yuji Iwata
2:09:30, Beppu-Oita 2019

Shinichi Watanabe
2:09:32, Berlin 2004
2:09:55, Biwako 2004

Hayato Sonoda
2:09:34, Beppu-Oita 2018

Kohei Ogino
2:09:36, Tokyo 2018

Fumihiro Maruyama
2:09:39, Biwako 2016

Tomonori Watanabe
2:09:40, Hofu 1999

Tomoyuki Sato
2:09:43, Tokyo Int'l 2004
2:09:59, Biwako 2008
2:09:59, Fukuoka Int'l 2008

Tadashi Isshiki
2:09:43, Tokyo 2018

Akinobu Murasawa
2:09:47, Tokyo 2018

Kazuhiro Matsuda
2:09:49, Berlin 2003

Masanari Shintaku
2:09:51, Fukuoka Int'l 1985

Kurao Umeki
2:09:52, Berlin 2003

Jo Fukuda
2:09:52, Gold Coast 2018

Masashi Hayashi
2:09:55, Biwako 2012

Michitane Noda
2:09:58, Fukuoka Int'l 2003

Tomoya Adachi
2:09:59, Fukuoka Int'l 2014


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Comments

Ashva said…
What a GREAT LIST of japanese marathon history!! Far out. From Seko, Soh Brothers , Taniguchi to Ogata, Irifune, from The Hakone Greats to Yoshida,
exxcellent.
Ha: From all the runs under 130min Kawauchi-san made about 6,5 % all by himself.
greeting from germany ,Patrick
Brett Larner said…
Japanese women are one person away from hitting 50 under 2:26. When it happens next month I'll do the same for them.
Anonymous said…
Love this! Thanks for keeping track & posting this!
Unknown said…
Amazing list, amazing job ! For comparing, in France we have only 10 runners having run below 2h10' (and 7 of them are naturalized ones born outside of France).

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