Skip to main content

World U20 Championships - Day Two Japanese Results

by Brett Larner



In a super-fast women's 3000 m that saw winner Beyenu Degefa (Ethiopia) break the World U20 Championships record in 8:41.76 and silver and bronze medalists Dalila Abdulkadir Gosa (Bahrain) and Konstanza Klosterhalfen (Germany) run national junior records, Japan's Nozomi Tanaka ran a PB of 9:01.16 for 8th, well out of the medals but ticking another box on the JAAF's target number of top eight finishes.  Wakana Kabasawa was next, 9th in 9:10.20.  The daughter of sub-2:30 amateur marathoner Chihiro Tanaka, Tanaka came in at #7 on the all-time Japanese junior list, only the second runner after 1500 m national record holder Yuriko Kobayashi to make the all-time lists for both 1500 m and 3000 m.  In the men's long jump final Yuki Hashioka came up short of a top eight placing, jumping 7.31 m for 10th.



The day's biggest success came from hurdler Takumu Furuya, who ran a PB 13.40 to win his 110 mH heat before returning to win again in the semi-finals in 13.41.  Teammate Pap Demba Hiramatsu also made it through to the semi-finals but failed to advance to the final.  In the men's high jump, Yuji Hiramatsu won his qualification group after clearing 2.16 m on his first attempt.  Both Kazuki Matsukiyo and Naoki Kitadani advanced to the men's 400 m semi-finals, finishing 2nd and 3rd in their heats.  2015 national high school champion Haruko Ishizuka did the same in the women's 400 m hurdles, finishing 3rd in her heat to move on to the semi-finals.  2014 and 2015 national high school champion Kenta Oshima and teammate Ippei Takeda were both stopped in the men's 100 m semis, Oshima finishing 4th in his semi-final in 10.43 and Takeda 6th in his in 10.56.

World U20 Championships Day Two
Bydgoszcz, Poland, 7/20/16
click here for complete results

Women's 3000 m Final
1. Beyenu Degefa (Ethiopia) - 8:41.76 - MR
2. Dalila Abdulkadir Gosa (Bahrain) - 8:46.42 - NJR
3. Konstanza Klosterhalfen (Germany) - 8:46.74 - NJR
-----
8. Nozomi Tanaka (Japan) - 9:01.16 - PB
9. Wakana Kabasawa (Japan) - 9:10.20

Men's Long Jump Final
1. Maykel Masso (Cuba) - 8.00 m -1.8 m/s
2. Miltadis Tentoglou (Greece) - 7.91 m -0.4 m/s
3. Darcy Roper (Australia) - 7.88 m -1.0 m/s
-----
10. Yuki Hashioka (Japan) - 7.31 m -0.5 m/s

Men's 100 m Semi-Final 1
1. Filippo Tortu (Italy) - 10.26 - Q
2. Mario Burke (Barbados) - 10.34 - Q
3. Raheem Chambers (Jamaica) - 10.36 - q
-----
4. Kenta Oshima (Japan) - 10.43

Men's 100 m Semi-Final 2
1. Noah Lyles (U.S.A.) - 10.22 - Q
2. Derick Silva (Brazil) - 10.37 - Q
3. Oliver Bromby (Great Britain) - 10.37 - PB
-----
6. Ippei Takeda (Japan) - 10.56

Men's 400 m Heat 2
1. Christopher Taylor (Jamaica) - 46.73 - Q
2. Kazuki Matsukiyo (Japan) - 46.78 - Q
3. Anthony Zambrano (Colombia) - 47.18 - Q

Men's 400 m Heat 3
1. Baboloki Thebe (Botswana) - 46.25 - Q
2. Luis Charles (Dominican Republic) - 47.09 - Q
3. Naoki Kitadani (Japan) - 47.32 - Q

Men's 110 m Hurdles Heat 6
1. Takumu Furuya (Japan) - 13.40 - PB, Q
2. Dawid Zebrowski (Poland) - 13.48 - PB, Q
3. James Weaver (Great Britain) - 13.65 - Q

Men's 110 m Hurdles Heat 7
1. Marcus Krah (U.S.A.) - 13.48 - Q
2. Pap Demba Hiramatsu (Japan) - 13.59 - PB, Q
3. Max Hrelia (Sweden) - 13.66 - NJR, Q

Men's 110 m Hurdles Semi-Final 1
1. Takumu Furuya (Japan) - 13.41 - Q
2. Matthew Treston (Great Britain) - 13.70 - Q
3. Juan Pablo Germain (Chile) - 13.72

Men's 110 m Hurdles Semi-Final 2
1. Marcus Krah (U.S.A.) - 13.36 - Q
2. James Weaver (Great Britain) - 13.40 - Q
3. Max Hrelia (Sweden) - 13.61 - NJR
-----
7. Pap Demba Hiramatsu (Japan) - 19.52

Womens 400 m Hurdles Heat 1
1. Eileen Demes (Germany) - 57.77 - PB, Q
2. Anais Seiller (France) - 58.44 - PB, Q
3. Haruko Ishizuka (Japan) - 58.66 - Q

Womens 400 m Hurdles Heat 3
1. Xahria Santiago (Canada) - 58.48 - Q
2. Julie Hounsinou (France) - 58.65 - PB, Q
3. Karoline Maria Sauer (Germany) - 59.37 - Q
-----
7. Mizuki Murakami (Japan) - 1:01.78

Men's High Jump Qualification Group A
1. Oleksandr Barannikov (Ukraine) - 2.16 m - q
2. Mohamat Alamine Hamoi (Qatar) - 2.16 m - q
3. Alperen Acet (Turkey) - 2.16 m - PB, q
-----
10. Keitaro Fujita (Japan) - 2.09 m

Men's High Jump Qualification Group B
1. Yuji Hiramatsu (Japan) - 2.16 m - q
2. Tom Gale (Great Britain) - 2.16 m - q
3. Maksim Nedasekau (Belarus) - 2.16 m - q

Men's Triple Jump Qualification Group B
1. Lazaro Martinez (Cuba) - 16.49 m +1.4 m/s - Q
2. Philipp Kronsteiner (Austria) - 16.19 m +0.9 m/s - NJR, Q
3. Jordan Scott (Jamaica) - 15.99 m +0.5 m/s - q
-----
9. Mutsuki Harada (Japan) - 15.70 m +1.4 m/s

Women's Shot Put Qualification Group B
1. Jiayuan Song (China) - 16.17 m - Q
2. Alina Kenzel (Germany) - 16.04 m - Q
3. Elena Bruckner (U.S.A.) - 15.50 m - Q
-----
5. Nanaka Kori (Japan) - 14.63 m

© 2016 Brett Larner
all rights reserved

Comments

Most-Read This Week

Kariuki Cracks Course Record at 30th Anniversary Ageo City Half Marathon

2017 Kanto Regionals 10000 m and half marathon D2 champion Simon Kariuki (Nihon Yakka Univ.)  overcame windy conditions at the 30th edition of the Ageo City Half Marathon to shave one second off the course record, winning in a PB 1:01:25.

Kariuki and 2017 Kanto Regionals D1 5000 m and 10000 m champ Patrick Mathenge Wambui (Nihon Univ.) took it out in the first km, setting up a fascinating duel between Kanto's top two collegiate men on the track.


Led by Hayato Seki, star runner of this year's Izumo Ekiden champ Tokai University in his half marathon debut, the main body of the Japanese pack gradually relinquished the lead to the Kenyan pair, down 50 seconds by 10 km and continuing to drift back from then. Ageo has typically seen its lead Japanese collegiate men running between high-61 and mid-62, but nobody in the field seemed willing to go ahead of Seki and the runner on his shoulder, 2017 World University Games half marathon gold medalist Kei Katanishi (Komazawa Univ.).


Near …

Breaking Down the Best-Ever Japanese Marathon Times By Country

Japanese marathoners these days have the reputation of rarely racing abroad, and of rarely racing well when they do. Back in the day that wasn't true; Japanese marathoners have won all the World Marathon Majors-to-be except New York, and two of the three Japanese men to have run 2:06 and all three women to have run 2:19 did it outside Japan. Whatever the extent to which things did turn inward along the way, the last few years have seen an uptick in Japanese runners going farther afield and running better there than any others before them.

The lists above and below show the fastest times run by Japanese athletes in different countries to 2:20:00 for men and 2:45:00 for women. Japanese men have run sub-2:20 marathons in 37 countries around the world including Japan, with Japanese women having cleared 2:45 in 33 countries including at home. Breaking it down by IAAF label times, more Japanese men have run label standard times abroad, but women have typically performed at a higher label…

Kosimbei, Kwemoi and Shitara Lead Hachioji 10000 m Field

Nestled deep in the misty foothills of the western Tokyo mountains, Hosei University's late November Hachioji Long Distance meet has quietly turned into one of the world's premier track 10000 m, its A-heat never quite dipping under 27 minutes yet but still producing record-setting depth and the two fastest Japanese men's 10000 m in history.
This year's entry list is another monster, with 27:02.59 man Nicholas Kosimbei (Toyota) leading 17 men with recent times under 28 minutes, twelve of them Kenyan, three Japanese and two Ethiopian. Fresh off a 27:22.73 win at last weekend's Nittai University Time Trials, two-time steeplechase junior world champion Jonathan Ndiku (Hitachi Butsuryu) is slated to pace what is scheduled to be a sub-28 race, but with Kosimbei, sub-27:30 men John Maina (Fujitsu) and Rodgers Chumo Kwemoi (Aisan Kogyo) and five others under 27:45 including last year's winnerRonald Kwemoi (Komori Corp.) on the list the front end should go faster. 
Rig…