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World U20 Championships - Day One Japanese Resuts

by Brett Larner

The World U20 Championships got moving Tuesday in Bydgoszcz, Poland with medals handed out in three events.  In the women's 10000 m race walk 2015 national high school champ Yukiko Mizoguchi delivered a PB 46:19.49 for 8th, about 45 seconds out of the medals but within the JAAF's much-loved top eight target.  Zhenxia Ma (China) took gold in 45:18.45, with 3rd placers Yehualeya Beletew (Ethiopia) and 4th-placer Valeria Ortuno (Mexico) scoring area records.  An East African making the podium has to be shaking the race walk world.



Japan-based Rodgers Chumo Kwemoi (Kenya), a second-year pro with the Aisan Kogyo corporate team, ran a meet record 27:25.23 to take gold in the men's 10000 m, just outkicking Aron Kifle (Eritrea) and Jacob Kiplimo (Uganda) with Kifle setting a national junior record.  Two athletes each from Kenya, Eritrea, Uganda and Ethiopia made up the top eight, with Tokai University first-year Hayato Seki (Japan) running a credible 28:57.76 for 9th.  Waseda University first-year Shota Onizuka was farther back in 13th in 29:36.97.  The continued development of Eritrea and Uganda, shutting Ethiopia out of the medals in this race, represents another challenge for countries like Japan and the U.S.A. already struggling with the dominance of Kenya and Ethiopia in distance events.



In the day's other medal event, national high school champion Shinichi Yukinaga did not advance to the men's shot put final, marking 17.73 m for 9th in his group.  Better luck came for Japan's two best medal chances, Haruka Kitaguchi and Mikako Yamashita, both of whom advanced in the women's javelin with 2015 World Youth Championships gold medalist Kitaguchi winning her group.  Two-time national high school champion Kenta Oshima and Ippei Takeda likewise both advanced in the  men's 100 m.  Women's 800 m and 1500 m national champion Chika Mukai was 5th in her heat to move on to the women's 3000 m steeplechase final, and Yuki Hashioka also made the men's long jump final after landing 5th in his qualifying group.

World U20 Championships Day One
Bydgoszcz, Poland, 7/19/16
click here for complete results

Men's 10000 m Final
1. Rodgers Chumo Kwemoi (Kenya) - 27:25.23 - MR
2. Aron Kifle (Eritrea) - 27.26.20 - NJR
3. Jacob Kiplimo (Uganda) - 27:26.68 - PB
-----
9. Hayato Seki (Japan) - 28:57.76
13. Shota Onizuka (Japan) - 29:36.97

Womens 10000 m Race Walk
1. Zhenxia Ma (China) - 45.18
2. Noemi Stella (Italy) - 45.23.85
3. Yehualeye Beletew (Ethiopia) - 45:33.69 - AJR
-----
8. Yukiho Mizoguchi (Japan) - 46:19.49 - PB

Men's 100 m Heat 1 -0.4 m/s
1. Jack Hale (Australia) - 10.48 - Q
2. Oliver Bromby (Great Britain) - 10.52 - Q
3. Ippei Takeda (Japan) - 10.61 - Q

Men's 100 m Heat 6 -0.6 m/s
1. Mario Burke (Barbados) - 10.33 - Q
2. Kenta Oshima (Japan) - 10.44 - Q
3. Raheem Chambers (Jamaica) - 10.45 - Q

Women's 400 m Heat 4
1. Tiffany James (Jamaica) - 52.98 - Q
2. Ivanna Avramchuk (Ukraine) - 54.71 - Q
3. Jenna Bromell (Ireland) - 54.98 - Q
-----
4. Haruko Ishizuka (Japan) - 55.20

Men's 1500 m Heat 3
1. Taresa Tolosa (Ethiopia) - 3:46.13 - PB, Q
2. Baptiste Mischler (France) - 3:46.41 - Q
3. Jakob Ingebrigtsen (Norway) - 3:46.53 - Q
-----
9. Ryohei Sakaguchi (Japan) - 3:49.21

Women's 3000 m Steeplechase Heat 1
1. Tigist Getnet (Bahrain) - 9:54.65 - Q
2. Betty Chepkemoi Kibet (Kenya) - 9:54.65 - PB, Q
3. Agrie Belachew (Ethiopia) - 9:54.84 - PB, Q
-----
5. Chika Mukai (Japan) - 10:13.61 - Q

Women's 3000 m Steeplechase Heat 2
1. Celliphine Chepteek Chespol (Kenya) - 9:55.21 - Q
2. Asimarech Naga (Ethiopia) - 10:05.71 - Q
3. Anna Emilie Moller (Denmark) - 10:06.26 - Q
-----
10. Yuki Shibata (Japan) - 10:25.66

Men's Long Jump Qualification Group A
1. Ja'Mari Ward (U.S.A.) - 7.96 m +0.4 m/s - PB, Q
2. Maykel D. Masso (Cuba) - 7.91 m +0.8 m/s - Q
3. Darcy Roper (Australia) - 7.65 m +0.3 m/s - Q
-----
7. Kazuma Adachi (Japan) - 7.51 m -1.2 m/s

Men's Long Jump Qualification Group B
1. Juan Miguel Echevarria (Cuba) - 7.89 m -1.0 m/s - Q
2. Tobias Capiau (Belgium) - 7.69 m +0.1 m/s - q
3. Yugant Shekhar Singh (India) - 7.68 m -1.0 m/s - q
-----
5. Yuki Hashioka (Japan) - 7.59 m +0.3 m/s - q

Men's Shot Put Qualification Group A
1. Korad Bukowiecki (Poland) - 21.73 - Q
2. Adrian Piperi III (U.S.A.) - 19.57 - Q
3. Cedric Trinemeier (Germany) - 19.22 m - q
-----
9. Shinichi Yukinaga (Japan) - 17.73 m

Women's Discus Throw Qualification Group B
1. Julia Ritter (Germany) - 53.84 m - PB, Q
2. Elena Bruckner (U.S.A.) - 53.83 m - Q
3. Alexandra Emilianov (Moldova) - 53.19 - Q
-----
11. Nanaka Kori (Japan) - 45.46 m

Women's Javelin Throw Qualification Group A
1. Eda Tugsuz (Turkey) - 57.77 m - Q
2. Hanna Tarasuk (Belarus) - 56.40 m - PB, Q
3. Chu Chnag (Taiwan) - 54.65 m - PB, Q
-----
5. Mikako Yamashita (Japan) - 53.47 m - q

Women's Javelin Throw Qualification Group B
1. Haruka Kitaguchi (Japan) - 56.16 m - Q
2. Jo-Ane Van Dyk (South Africa) - 54.06 m - Q
3. Geraldine Ruckstuhl (Switzerland) - 52.50 - PB, q

© 2016 Brett Larner
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