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Matsunaga Sets 10000 m Race Walk National University Record at Kanto Regionals Day Three

by Brett Larner

Toyo University fourth year Daisuke Matsunaga delivered the biggest result of the third day of competition at the 2016 Kanto Region University Track and Field Championships, breaking the men's 10000 m national university record by two seconds to win in 38:16.76.  Meet records also came in the D1 women's hammer throw and D1 men's pole vault, Hitomi Katsuyama (Tsukuba Univ.) breaking her own record by nearly two meters with a throw of 62.61 m and Koki Kuruma (Juntendo Univ.) clearing 5.40 m to tie the existing Kanto Regionals record.

Kuruma's Juntendo teammate Kazuya Shiojiri returned from a 3rd-place finish as the top Japanese man in Thursday's D1 10000 m and the fastest time in the 3000 mSC heats on Friday to win the D1 3000 mSC final, just missing the 39-year-old meet record by 2 seconds to take first in 8:37.84.  Soyoka Segawa continued the Daito Bunka University domination of the women's steeple, claiming the title in 10:10.68.

The Kanto Region University Track and Field Championships wrap up tomorrow at Yokohama's Nissan Stadium.

95th Kanto Region University Track and Field Championships Day Three
Nissan Stadium, Yokohama, Kanagawa, 5/21/16
click here for complete results

Division 1 Men's 3000 mSC Final
1. Kazuya Shiojiri (2nd yr., Juntendo Univ.) - 8:37.84
2. Yasutaka Ishibashi (4th yr., Tokai Univ.) - 8:48.86
3. Hikaru Nakano (4th yr., Daito Bunka Univ.) - 8:50.32
4. Yuhei Koyama (4th yr., Yamanashi Gakuin Univ.) - 8:52.30
5. Kota Oki (1st yr., Waseda Univ.) - 8:53.70

Division 2 Men's 3000 mSC Final
1. Taisei Ogino (1st yr., Kanagawa Univ.) - 8:57.41
2. Masaki Sakuda (2nd yr., Soka Univ.) - 9:00.17
3. Kazuki Tamura (4th yr., Tokyo Nogyo Univ.) - 9:00.34

Division 1 Women's 3000 mSC Final
1. Soyoka Segawa (4th yr., Daito Bunka Univ.) - 10:10.68
2. Moeno Shimizu (2nd yr., Tokyo Nogyo Univ.) - 10:14.53
3. Maki Izumida (3rd yr., Rikkyo Univ.) - 10:15.44

Division 1 Men's 10000 mRW
1. Daisuke Matsunaga (4th yr., Toyo Univ.) - 38:16.76 - NUR
2. Fumitaka Oikawa (3rd yr., Toyo Univ.) - 40:03.67
3. Tomohiro Noda (3rd yr., Meiji Univ.) - 40:22.86

Division 2 Men's 10000 mRW
1. Seiya Watanabe (4th yr., Tokyo Univ.) - 42:00.47
2. Taiga Takizawa (1st yr., Heisei Kokusai Univ.) - 42:04.11
3. Katsuya Endo (4th yr., Tokyo Nogyo Univ.) - 42:19.31

Division 1 Men's High Jump
1. Yuji Hiramatsu (2nd yr., Tsukuba Univ.) - 2.22 m
2. Ryo Sato (4th yr., Tokai Univ.) - 2.22 m
3. Yoshihiro Yamashita (4th yr., Toyo Univ.) - 2.19 m

Division 1 Men's Pole Vault
1. Koki Kuruma (3rd yr., Juntendo Univ.) - 5.40 m - MR
2. Takumi Okamoto (2nd yr., Nittai Univ.) - 5.20 m
3. Shingo Sawa (2nd yr., Nihon Univ.) - 5.20 m

Division 2 Men's Long Jump
1. Naoya Yoshizawa (3rd yr., Sakushin Univ.) - 7.57 m +0.6 m/s
2. Yuta Mizushima (3rd yr., Tokyo Gakugei Univ.) - 7.51 m -0.2 m/s
3. Satoshi Ninomiya (4th yr., Tsuru Bunka Univ.) - 7.49 m +1.6 m/s

Division 1 Women's Triple Jump
1.Saki Kenmochi (4th yr., Tsukuba Univ.) - 12.62 m -0.8 m/s
2. Mariko Morimoto (4th yr., Nihon Joshi Taiiku Univ.) - 12.61 m -1.0 m/s
3. Yume Asazuma (3rd yr., Chuo Univ.) - 12.44 m +0.4 m/s

Division 2 Men's Discus Throw
1. Shingo Miyairi (3rd yr., Tokyo Gakugei Univ.) - 45.40 m
2. Kohei Yaguchi (3rd yr., Saitama Univ.) - 41.53 m
3. Tsubasa Watanabe (3rd yr., Kokusai Budo Univ.) - 40.89 m

Division 1 Men's Hammer Throw
1. Takuya Matsubara (4th yr., Nihon Univ.) - 62.43 m
2. Masayoshi Okumura (4th yr., Ryutsu Keizai Univ.) - 61.90 m
3. Takaya Nakasako (3rd yr., Tokai Univ.) - 61.87 m

Division 2 Men's Hammer Throw
1. Hiroki Sueya (4th yr., Kokusai Budo Univ.) - 58.33 m
2. Katsuya Hirata (4th yr., Kokusai Budo Univ.) - 53.39 m
3. Ryoya Takano (4th yr., Kokusai Budo Univ.) - 52.41 m

Division 1 Women's Hammer Throw
1. Hitomi Katsuyama (4th yr., Tsukuba Univ.) - 62.61 m - MR
2. Kosumo Ehara (2nd yr., Tsukuba Univ.) - 57.75 m
3. Kiyono Sekiguchi (1st yr., Tsukuba Univ.) - 54.16 m

Division 2 Men's Javelin Throw
1. Takashi Yabe (3rd yr., Hitotsubashi Univ.) - 63.88 m
2. Kazushi Sakurai (3rd yr., Kokusai Budo Univ.) - 63.69 m
3. Ryoma Nakaura (3rd yr., Ibaraki Univ.) - 62.62 m

© 2016 Brett Larner
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