Tuesday, August 4, 2015

JADA Indicates It Cannot Rush to Judgment on Allegations of Doping in Athletics


translated by Brett Larner

With regard to foreign media's allegations of suspicion of doping among a large umber of Olympics and World Championships track and field medalists, on Aug. 3 Japan Anti-Doping Agency (JADA) executive director Shin Asakawa commented, "I do not know specifically what abnormal values (that would suggest doping) there may be.  The risk is that by looking at them too hastily things may be judged to be violations just because they are unusual," recognizing that there should be no rush to judgment without understanding of the detailed data.

British and German media reported that in the Olympic Games and World Championships from 2001 to 2012, the winners of 146 medals in endurance events had values that indicated a suspicion of doping, with test results indicating that 5% of Japanese athletes also returned abnormal values.  "We do not know what the reaction of the body may be without looking at the long-term.  Some people have innate endurance ability," Asakawa said, arguing that in some cases it is not possible to determine that something is a violation on the basis of a single test.

JAAF executive director Mitsugi Ogata commented, "We do not know whether what the media is reporting is the truth and must gather more information.  Japan conducts its drug testing strictly.  I believe in our athletes and have absolutely no worries at all."

1 comment:

Brett Larner said...

With regard to Ogata's assertion about Japanese drug testing, although it is true that there is both in and out of competition testing within Japan, of the corporate league athletes I have taken to overseas races over the last four years roughly 1/3 of those selected for post-race testing said it was the first time they had ever been tested. These were people who had done through the high school and in many cases the university systems before going on to varying lengths of time in the corporate system without ever undergoing drug testing either in or out of competition.