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Payton Jordan Invitational - Japanese Results

by Brett Larner

Although Japanese men largely stayed away from Stanford University's Payton Jordan Invitational this year, three more women picked up qualifying marks for this year's Beijing World Championships.  In the 10000 m, Yuka Takashima (Team Denso) improved on her qualifying mark with a 31:37.32 best for 4th, while behind her teammates Mao Kiyota and Eri Makikawa (both Suzuki Hamamatsu AC) ran 31:44.79 and 31:48.22 to expand the list of candidates for the Beijing team to six.  5000 m national champion Misaki Onishi (Team Sekisui Kagaku) likewise ran a best of 15:16.82 to get under the 15:20.00 Beijing standard, bringing that list of candidates up to three.   Men's 10000 m national champion Yuki Sato (Team Nissin Shokuhin) duly turned in the top men's performance of the day, a 27:57.13 that made him the first Japanese man this year to break 28 but still left him far off the sub-27:45.00 Beijing standard.

Payton Jordan Invitational
Stanford, California, U.S.A., 5/2/15
click here for complete results

Women's 10000 m Section 1
1. Susan Kuijken (Netherlands) - 31:31.97
2. Buze Diribe (Ethiopia) - 31:33.27
3. Jip Vastenburg (Netherlands) - 31:35.48
4. Yuka Takashima (Japan/Denso) - 31:37.32
5. Emily Sisson (U.S.A.) - 31:38.03
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9. Mao Kiyota (Japan/Suzuki Hamamatsu AC) - 31:44.79
12. Eri Makikawa (Japan/Suzuki Hamamatsu AC) - 31:48.22
17. Doricah Obare (Kenya/Hitachi) - 32:03.18
19. Kasumi Nishihara (Japan/Yamada Denki) - 32:23.65
23. Misaki Kato (Japan/Kyudenko) - 32:30.94
29. Yuki Mitsunobu (Japan/Denso) - 33:16.79
30. Shiho Takechi (Japan/Yamada Denki) - 33:30.89
32. Rina Yamazaki (Japan/Panasonic) - 33:41.05

Women's 10000 m Section 2
1. Ines Melchor (Peru) - 31:56.62 - NR
2. Yuka Ando (Japan/Suzuki Hamamatsu AC) - 32:07.37
3. Sayaka Kuwahara (Japan/Sekisui Kagaku) - 32:14.43
4. Serena Burla (U.S.A.) - 32:17.34
5. Jessica Trengove (Australia) - 32:17.67

Men's 10000 m Section 1
1. Andy Vernon (GBR) - 27:42.62
2. Ben True (U.S.A.) - 27:43.79
3. Ben St. Lawrence (Australia) - 27:44.24
4. David McNeill (Australia) - 27:45.01
5. Mo Ahmed (Canada) - 27:46.90
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8. Kassa Mekashaw (Ethiopia/Yachiyo Kogyo)
13. Yuki Sato (Japan/Nissin Shokuhin) - 27:57.13
16. Yuta Shitara (Japan/Honda) - 28:01.65
25. Keita Shitara (Japan/Konica Minolta) - 28:42.05

Women's 5000 m Section 1
1. Sally Kipyego (Kenya) - 14:57.44
2. Betsy Saina (Kenya) - 15:00.48
3. Nicole Tully (U.S.A.) - 15:05.58
4. Jessica O'Connell (Canada) - 15:06.44
5. Maureen Koster (Netherlands) - 15:07.73
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10. Misaki Onishi (Japan/Sekisui Kagaku) - 15:16.82
16. Yuika Mori (Japan/Yamada Denki) - 15:20.21
22. Yuka Miyazaki (Japan/Kyudenko) - 15:49.95

Women's 5000 m Section 2
1. Chelsea Reilly (U.S.A.) - 15:34.59
2. Miho Shimizu (Japan/Hokuren) - 15:35.53
3. Giulia Alessandra Viola (Italy) - 15:38.47
4. Tansey Lystad (U.S.A.) - 15:42.22
5. Kaitlin Gregg Goodman (U.S.A.) - 15:42.80
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9. Naoko Koizumi (Japan/Denso) - 15:46.73
20. Akari Ota (Japan/Tenmaya) - 16:15.70
21. Sakiho Tsutsui (Japan/Yamada Denki) - 16:26.33

Men's 3000 mSC Section 1
1. Stanley Kebenei (U.S.A.) - 8:23.93
2. Dan Huling (U.S.A.) - 8:24.61
3. Alex Genest (Canada) - 8:24.84
4. Taylor Milne (Canada) - 8:25.46
5. Tabor Stevens (U.S.A.) - 8:26.81
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12. Aoi Matsumoto (Japan/Otsuka Seiyaku) - 8:45.10

Men's 3000 mSC Section 2
1. Gerard Giraldo (Colombia) - 8:35.30
2. James Nipperess (Australia) - 8:35.39
3. Daniel Lundgren (Sweden) - 8:37.72
4. Mike Hardy (U.S.A.) - 8:41.44
5. Ryan Brockerville (Canada) - 8:43.68
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8. Jun Shinoto (Japan/Sanyo Tokushu Seiko) - 8:49.32
12. Minato Yamashita (Japan/NTN) - 8:56.39

Women's 3000 mSC Section 1
1. Courtney Frerichs (U.S.A.) - 9:32.12
2. Colleen Quigley (U.S.A.) - 9:33.63
3. Jessica Furlan (Canada) - 9:39.20
4. Aisha Praught (U.S.A.) - 9:40.43
5. Genevieve Lalonde (Canada) - 9:46.05
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14. Misaki Sango (Japan/Suzuki Hamamatsu AC) - 10:08.92

Women's 3000 mSC Section 2
1. Collier Lawrence (U.S.A.) - 9:50.47
2. Mary Goldkamp (U.S.A.) - 9:53.66
3. Tori Gerlach (U.S.A.) - 9:57.47
4. Jamie Cheever (U.S.A.) - 9:59.48
5. Rolanda Bell (Panama) - 10:05.95
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8. Chikako Mori (Japan/Sekisui Kagaku) - 10:14.99

(c) 2015 Brett Larner
all rights reserved

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