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Great North Run Start Lists

by Brett Larner

Scratches from the upper end of the entry lists for tomorrow's Great North Run include Koen Raymaekers (Netherlands) and Andy Vernon (Great Britain) in the men's race and #1-ranked Brit Gemma Steel, Irene Jerotich (Kenya), Jen Rhines (U.S.A.), Laura Whittle (Great Britain) and Abigail Bayley (Great Britain) in the women's race.

2013 Great North Run Start List Highlights
Newcastle-South Shields, U.K., 9/15/13

Men
Kenenisa Bekele (Ethiopia) - debut
Haile Gebrselassie (Ethiopia) - 58:55 (Phoenix, 2006)
Mo Farah (Great Britain) - 1:00:22 (New York 2011)
Collis Birmingham (Australia) - 1:00:56 (Marugame 2013)
Daniele Meucci (Italy) - 1:01:06 (New York 2013)
Arata Fujiwara (Japan/Miki House) - 1:01:34 (Marugame 2012)
Tomohiro Tanigawa (Japan/Team Konica Minolta) - 1:02:17 (Marugame 2013)
Yuki Kawauchi (Japan/Saitama Pref. Gov't) - 1:02:18 (Marugame 2012)
Jonathan Mellor (Great Britain) - 1:02:59 (New York 2012)
Ryota Matoba (Japan/Team Komori Corp.) - 1:03:15 (Nat'l Corporate Championships 2013)
Yared Hagos (Ethiopia) - 1:03:31 (Great North Run 2011)
Ryuji Watanabe (Japan/Team Toyota Kyushu) - 1:04:01 (Shibetsu 2013)
Jonny Hay (Great Britain) - 1:04:45 (Great North Run 2012)
Neil Renault (Great Britain) - 1:04:47 (Den Haag 2011)
Mark Kenneally (Ireland) - 2:13:55 (Amsterdam Marathon 2011)

Women
Priscah Jeptoo (Kenya) - 1:06:11 (Ras Al Khaimah 2013)
Meseret Defar (Ethiopia) - 1:07:25 (New Orleans 2013)
Tirunesh Dibaba (Ethiopia) - 1:07:35 (Great North Run 2012)
Jelena Prokopcuka (Lativa) - 1:08:09 (Great North Run 2012)
Christelle Daunay (France) - 1:08:34 (Reims 2010)
Jessica Augusto (Portugal) - 1:09:08 (Great North Run 2009)
Lisa Stublic (Croatia) - 1:09:18 (New York 2013)
Alyson Dixon (Great Britain) - 1:11:21 (Bath 2013)
Rebecca Robinson (Great Britain) - 1:13:11 (Bristol 2009)
Julie Briscoe (Great Britain) - 1:13:29 (Wilmslow 2011)
Ayaka Hitomi (Japan/Team Shimamura) - 1:14:23 (Nat'l Corporate Championships 2013)
Misaki Kato (Japan/Team Kyudenko) - 33:10.83 (Kitakyushu 2013)

text and photo (c) 2013 Brett Larner
all rights reserved

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