Skip to main content

Moscow World Championships - Day Two Japanese Results

by Brett Larner

National champion Hitomi Niiya (Team Universal Entertainment) ran exactly the race prefigured by her win at June's National Championships and in last year's London Olympics, going out right behind early rabbit Shalane Flanagan (U.S.A.) in the Moscow World Championships 10000 m, taking the lead after 3000 m and setting the pace all the way to the last lap before finishing 5th in a PB 30:56.70.  In a tearful post-race interview she said, "There's no reason to be at Worlds if you can't medal," but her fearlessness in setting her own pace and her improvement of her standing as all-time third-fastest Japanese for the second time at a major international championships did credit to both her and her coach Yoshio Koide.  Kyushu-based Sally Chepyego (Kenya/Team Kyudenko) also turned in a PB performance, taking 7th in 31:22.11.

In other events, 400 m national champion Yuzo Kanemaru (Team Otsuka Seiyaku) finished last in his qualifying heat but still slipped through to the semi-finals on time in 46.18.  Race walker Takumi Saito  (Toyo University) took 6th in the men's 20 km in 1:22:09, with his teammate Yusuke Suzuki (Team Fujitsu) not far back in 12th in 1:23:20. Decathlon national champion Keisuke Ushiro (Suzuki Hamamatsu AC) improved on his standing from the first day of competition, ending up in 22nd overall.

Moscow World Championships - Day Two
Moscow, 8/11/13
click here for complete results

Women's 10000 m
1. Tirunesh Dibaba (Ethiopia) - 30:43.35
2. Gladys Cherono (Kenya) - 30:45.17
3. Belaynesh Oljira (Ethiopia) - 30:46.98
4. Emily Chebet (Kenya) - 30:47.02 - PB
5. Hitomi Niiya (Japan) - 30:56.70 - PB
6. Shitaye Eshete (Bahrain) - 31:13.79
7. Sally Chepyego (Kenya) - 31:22.11 - PB
8. Shalane Flanagan (U.S.A.) - 31:34.83
9. Ababel Yeshaneh (Ethiopia) - 32:02.09
10. Christele Daunay (France) - 32:04.44

1. Luguelin Santos (Dominican Republic) - 45.23 - Q
2. Kevin Borlee (Belgium) - 45.32 - Q
3. Chris Brown (Bahamas) - 45.39 - Q
4. Nigel Levine (Great Britain) - 45.41 - Q
5. Omar Johnson (Jamaica) - 45.97 - q
6. Yuzo Kanemaru (Japan) - 46.18 - q
DNF - Daniel Aleman (Nicaragua)

Men's 20 km Race Walk
1. Aleksandr Ivanov (Russia) - 1:20:58 - PB
2. Ding Chen (China) - 1:21:09
3. Miguel Angel Lopez (Spain) - 1:21:21
4. Joao Vieira (Portugal) - 1:22:05
5. Denis Strelkov (Russia) - 1:22:06
6. Takumi Saito (Japan) - 1:22:09
7. Ruslan Dmytrenko (Ukraine) - 1:22:14
8. Inaki Gomez (Canada) - 1:22:21
9. Christopher Linke (Germany) - 1:22:36
10. Hyunsub Kim (South Korea) - 1:22:50
-----
12. Yusuke Suzuki (Japan) - 1:23:20

Men's Decathlon
1. Ashton Eaton (U.S.A.) - 8809
2. Michael Schrader (Germany) - 8670 - PB
3. Damian Warner (Canada) - 8512 - PB
4. Kevin Mayer (France) - 8446 - PB
5. Eelco Sintnicolaas (Netherlands) - 8391
6. Carlos Chinin (Brazil) - 8388
7. Rico Freimuth (Germany) - 8382 - PB
8. Ilya Shkurenev (Russia) - 8370 - PB
9. Willem Coertzen (South Africa) - 8343 - AR
10. Leonel Suarez (Cuba) - 8317
-----
22. Keisuke Ushiro (Japan) - 7751

(c) 2013 Brett Larner
all rights reserved

Comments

TokyoRacer said…
I think Niiya won a lot of fans for Japanese running. Especially since everyone in the world, including herself I suppose, knew that those four were going to blast past her on the last lap.
Brett Larner said…
Agreed.

She also did the same thing in the Olympics last year, which nobody seems to remember, but lasted longer up front, was faster and placed higher this time. Maybe in two years she'll have progressed far enough.

It was interesting too that she ran it exactly like she did at Nationals, just with a faster first 3000 m.

Most-Read This Week

"Each Race Gives You the Chance to Examine Yourself" - Kiyoko Shimahara on Failure, Success and International Competition

interview and translation by Brett Larner
photos by Mika Tokairin

Kiyoko Shimahara set the course records at the Hokkaido and Katsuta marathons. A silver medalist at the 2006 Asian Games, she finished 6th at the 2007 World Championships in Osaka. After a few years in a rut she returned to form in the fall of 2009 with a PB and two other sub-2:30 runs in just over 100 days. Shimahara talked to JRN before her race at the 2010 Nagano Marathon.



You ran at Kokushikan University and joined Shiseido after graduating. What drew you to Shiseido?

I was really slow when I was in university, but I knew that I still wanted to run for a corporate team somewhere. I talked to different teams and was a bit lucky with the timing, and Shiseido was the one that offered to pick me up.

Did you already know coach Manabu Kawagoe before that?

When I was a student? No, not at all. The first year I was at Shiseido it was a different coach. Coach Kawagoe came in during my second year there.

For you first marathon in …

"Not an International Way of Thinking" - Stephen Mayaka on Fitting Into Japan's Corporate Team World as a Foreigner

Stephen Mayaka was the first Kenyan high school runner in Japan and the first to go the complete route from high school to university and on into the corporate running world. Now a Japanese citizen, married to a former World Championships-level Japanese marathoner and head coach of Obirin University’s ekiden team, Mayaka is a mentor to Kenyan athletes both across Japan and back in Kenya. JRN interviewed Mayaka just before New Year, 2010 for an article for Running Times magazine. This is part two of his interview. Click here for part one.



Part Two: The Corporate Life, Pros and Cons

At the professional level, in your day-to-day life in the corporate teams how is it for Kenyan runners or other foreign athletes?

I think every company has its own schedule. I support some companies, and I don’t support some other companies, the way they are using us. There are different understandings. I think there are companies that need a Kenyan just to run in the ekiden championships and some that need hi…

The MGC and the Marathon Teams it Made

Something I wrote for another outlet on the 13th but which subsequent events bumped off the priority list.

On Mar. 12 the JAAF held a press conference in Koriyama, Fukushima to introduce the members of its super-prestigious women’s and men’s marathon teams for the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games. It was the culmination of an almost three-year process to put together a team with the best chance of winning a home-soil medal in the event Japan treasures more than any other. Let’s take a look at that process.



The Background

Marathons are a major spectator sport in Japan, with live nationwide broadcasts of its main races. The most important of these, for women the Saitama International Marathon, Osaka Women’s Marathon and Nagoya Women’s Marathon, and for men the Fukuoka International Marathon, Tokyo Marathon and Lake Biwa Mainichi Marathon, have traditionally served as selection races for Olympic teams, with consideration sometimes also given to 2nd-tier races like the Hokkaido Marathon and Beppu-…