Skip to main content

Kiryu, Saitama Sakae Set Records at National High School Championships (updated)

http://www.jiji.com/jc/zc?k=201307/2013073100713&g=spo
http://www.saitama-np.co.jp/news/2013/07/31/08.html

translated and edited by Brett Larner

On the second day of the National High School Track and Field Championships, July 31 at Oita's Oita Bank Dome, Yoshihide Kiryu (Rakunan H.S.) won the boys' 100 m in a meet record time of 10.19 s +0.1m/s.  In the heats he ran 10.50 s and in the semi-finals 10.32 s, winning both before the final where he took 0.05 s off the old meet record set nineteen years ago.  Kiryu also anchored Rakunan's 4x100 m relay team to win their semi-final in 40.50 s, sending them on to the final on Aug. 1.

On the girls' side, London Olympian Anna Doi (Saitama Sakae H.S.) won the 100 m final in 11.70 m. Like Kiryu anchoring her school's 4x100 m relay, Doi led Saitama Sakae to win their July 30 opening round heat in 45.23 s, a new high school national record.  First leg runner Emiri Hatsumi was first out of the blocks and immediately opened a lead that second and third runners Ayaka Abe and Miyu Yoshida extended before Doi took the baton.  "I never even thought of cruising it in," said Doi, who ran full-strength to the line to break the old high school national record of 45.72 set by Saitama Sakae H.S. at the 1992 National Championships.  "I believed in the seniors, so I ran carefree," said junior Hatsumi.  "I'm happy, but we can't get careless yet," said Abe.  Yoshida added, "We have to stay focused on reaching the top."  Doi agreed, saying, "If we don't end up #1 in Japan then this doesn't mean anything.  We have to keep winning."  So far so good: in the semi-finals on July 31 Saitama Sakae won again in 45.96.  The finals await on Aug. 1.

Other noteworthy performances included a 46.11 meet record in the boys' 400 m final by Nobuya Kato (Hamana H.S.) and a 53.66 meet record in the girls' 400 m final by Ayaka Oki (Niijima Gakuen H.S), five boys under 3:50 in the 1500 m final led by Takumi Kitashima (Toyama Shogyo H.S.) in 3:47.54 and a girls' 5000 m racewalk meet record of 22:45.28 courtesy of Kaori Kawazoe (Ritsumeikan Uji H.S.).

Update: Rakunan H.S. won the boys' 4x100 m relay final in 40.21, Saitama Sakae H.S. taking the girls' race in 45.62.

Comments

Bruce said…
Yoshihide Kiryu's pre meet marks in the 100m (10.01) and 200m (20.59) would be tops in USA as well. Anna Doi's 11.66 would put her in the top 15 in USA high school.

400 meters. Shigeki Nakagawa's 46.97 (Aichi - Toyokawa Sr) would rank him 6th in the USA.

Sayaka Ouki 53.66 (Gunma), and along with Haruka Sugiura's pre-meet mark 53.66 would put them in top 5 of the USA; Yuuki Jinbou (Ishikawa) and Seika Aoyama (Shimane) would be top 10 with their 54.24.

The 4x100m marks of Kanagawa Soyo, Sendai Ikue and Kyoto Rakunan boys would be 3 of top 4 marks in USA; and Saitama Sakae, Kanagawa Soyo and Tokyo high schools girls would be in the top 10.

In the 1500m, both countries have 6 boys under 3:50, although Takumi Murashima's winning time of 3:47.54 places him behind 3 Americans.
For the girls, Mary Cain's American mark of 4:04.62 bests Rosemary Wanjiru's 4:09.90, but then the Japanese girls take 18 of the next 20 marks under 4:23.

Hurdles, racewalk and throws can't be easily compared, because Americans compete shorter distances, lower hurdles and lighter implements, with the exception of some girls events.

American boys rarely run as far as 5000 meters or the 3000m steeplechase. In the latter, there are 35 boys of Japan under 9:20 and only 3 Americans; no American high school lists are kept of the 5000m in track (only in cross country).

The girls 3000m is interesting, with 2 Americans, 1 Canadian and 80 Japanese listed under 9:40. Even subtracting 40 seconds from 3200m marks would only add 8 more Americans to the mix.
Brett Larner said…
Thank you as always, Bruce. I'm on holiday at the moment and don't have time to cover all the events, so thank you for that overview.
Bruce said…
With nearly all results in: most of them can be seen in English at
http://www.athletic.net/TrackAndField/MeetResults.aspx?Meet=198043

4x400m boys led by Kanagawa - Soyo Jr-Sr, Japan would place 2 3 4 6 against their USA counterparts. The girls go 1 4 5 10.

Javelin - Taisei Aibara of Ehime - Imabarikita is boys leader in both countries by over a meter and Mako Tanaka of Toyama Takaoka Commercial would be third in the girls.

200m - With Yoshihide Kiryou at the top, Hokkaido's Yuuki Koike and Yuu Takahashi would slip into the top 10.

400m - 3 boys in top 10

800m Yuuki Hirota 2:05.65 leads both countries, and Nana Kuraoka and Ayumi Tsukanaka would join her in the top 6.

3000 meters, 5000 meters and 3000 meter steeple chase:

Rosemary Wanjiru's 8:49.32 would be the boys record for most American high schools. - You'd have to go to USA big school (NCAA Div 1) collegiates to see a race of this caliber.

Hiroaki Oyama and Hiroshi Yanokura at just under 8:55 and Hiroaki Mogi in 8:58 in the steeplechase would be best in NCAA Division 3 collegiates this year.

The 5000m race, won by Hiramu Ngatia in13:44.03, was comparable to best in NCAA Division 3

Most-Read This Week

Tokyo Experiments With Spraying Water Along 2020 Marathon Course to Combat Heat

As part of its measures to deal with the hot conditions expected at the 2020 Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games, on Aug. 13 the Tokyo Metropolitan Government conducted an experiment to measure the effects on pavement surface temperature of spraying the road surface with water. Data from the experiments were released to the media.

The experiment was conducted from 4:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. along a 120 m section of sidewalk along Uchibori Street in the Imperial Palace's outer gardens in Chiyoda Ward.  In the experiment, open-ended tubes used in agricultural work eres placed at the edge of the sidewalk  to supply water. Surface temperature readings were taken every 30 minutes for three different experimental scenarios:
spraying water beginning at 4:00 a.m.spraying water beginning at 7:00 a.m.not spraying any water The experiment found that where water had been sprayed, the road surface temperature remained in the 27 to 29˚C range even when the air temperature exceeded 30˚C. Where no wa…

On Broadcast Commentary

It's been 122 days since the 122nd Boston Marathon. Of what the two exceptional people who won that day accomplished, WilliamShakespeare summed it up better than any other commentator in his Sonnet 122:

Beyond all date, even to eternity;
     Or at the least, so long as brain and heart
     Have faculty by nature to subsist;
     Till each to razed oblivion yield his part
     Of thee, thy record never can be miss'd.

What else needs to be said? But the other thing that remains from that day is, of course, this:

Worst punditry ever? #Yukipic.twitter.com/AwjeuZDtOt — Xempo Running (@xempouk) April 16, 2018
In the 122 days since Boston this clip has been on my mind a lot. The commentary here by Larry Rawson and Al Trautwig was exceptionally bad, but it wasn't unique to them and highlighted many of the problems with marathon TV broadcasts and especially their hosts and commentators. I'm fortunate to live in Japan where the announcers for the countless marathon live TV broadcas…

The Asian Games Marathon Course: An Early Morning Start for Loops of the City's Main Roads

Its skyline punctuated by skyscrapers demonstrating Indonesia's economic ascension. A lush plaza holding a famed tower, the symbol of the metropolis. When Jakarta hosts the Asian Games next week its marathon course will loop around the city's main streets, starting and finishing from the Games' main venue, Gelola Bungarno Stadium. In light of the heat and humidity of the races' summertime dates, Aug. 25 for men and 26 for women, the marathons will get off to early starts at 6:00 a.m. local time, 8:00 a.m. Japan time.

Leaving the stadium for the main streets, the Jakarta course turns to the north before turning back. Each of the two loops is about 20 km, both mostly flat and straight with the only hills coming in the gentle climbs onto and off the waterway bridges that dot the route. At a rotary about 5 km from the start, runners are greeted by a statue of a man and woman built in 1962 the last time Jakarta hosted the Asian Games. Running on amid the highrises, around …