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Russian Tatyana Aryasova Stripped of 2011 Tokyo Marathon Title After Testing Positive for Masking Agent

http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/sports/news/20120124-OYT1T00932.htm?from=main6
http://www.sanspo.com/sports/news/120124/spg1201241730001-n1.htm

translated and edited by Brett Larner

The Tokyo Marathon Foundation announced on Feb. 24 that a doping test performed at the Feb. 27, 2011 Tokyo Marathon on women's winner Tatyana Aryasova of Russia returned positive for HES (hydroxyethyl starch), a banned substance typically used to conceal use of other banned performance-enhancing substances.  As a result of the positive test Aryasova has been stripped of her 2011 title.  Runner-up Noriko Higuchi (Team Wacoal) has been elevated to the winner's place and will be paid the difference in prize money from her previous finishing position.

According to the Japan Anti-Doping Agency, HES is used to conceal blood doping carried out to improve aerobic performance.  This is the first time the substance has been detected at a race within Japan, but the number of athletes caught using it in overseas cycling races and similar events is considerable.  According to the Tokyo Marathon Foundation, the announcement of the result was held until the completion of the proper procedures by the IAAF.  Aryasova will be stripped of all race results following last year's Tokyo Marathon and will serve a two-year ban beginning last April 29.

Translator's note: Click here for the Tokyo Marathon's official announcement of Aryasova's positive doping test and the removal of her name as last year's winner.

As of this writing Aryasova is listed as an athlete represented by Spartanik RS Inc. International Sport Management, an agency headed by IAAF Registered Athlete Representative Andrey Baranov.  Baranov also represents Russian women's marathon national record holder Liliya Shobukhova, Mariya Konovalova, and Inga Abitova, with Spartanik RS Inc. listing a large number of the world-class Russian long-distance women as its clients.  Also on the list are Lidiya Grigoryeva and Ukrainian Tetiana Gamera-Shmyrko, invited athletes for Sunday's Osaka International Women's Marathon.  A screen shot of Spartanik RS Inc.'s current athlete listing, including both Aryasova and 2011 Tokyo Marathon 3rd-place finisher Tatyana Petrova along with Shobukhova, Konovalova, Abitova, Grigoyeva and other well-known Russian women:

Comments

Anonymous said…
I think it´s always a bit problematic when the names of athletes are mentioned in the same article that deals with the doping offenses of another athlete (even when no accusations are made).
When Martin Fagan was busted not long ago, I cannot think of one article that cared to mention that Fagan`s agency Flynn Sports Management also represents athletes like Ryan Hall, Deena Kastor, Jennifer Simpson, Lauren Fleshman and so on.
http://www.flynnsports.com/speaker

I don´t understand the need to write this note.
Brett Larner said…
That's a reasonable enough statement, although likewise it is difficult to understand why you might make it and then anonymously do exactly what you have just questioned.

As you say, no accusations are being made, but given the unprecedented nature of the doping violation at a Japanese race I think the fact that the people responsible for bringing the convicted athlete last year are bringing two athletes to another major race this weekend is worth noting.
Ozzie406 said…
I personally don't see an issue naming other athletes that belong to the same sports management company. If you are innocent, why would you care, it isn't slanderous. I think this would give race directors a heads up on who is responsible and might give them a chance to police themselves, if needed. It's too bad that it has infiltrated the japanes Marathon scene.
Ukraine Women said…
This is the common issues faced among athletes. Some are accused or proven of using drugs or steroids. This is such a bad news regarding Tatyana Aryasova as I thought she is a good athlete.

I agree with what you said Ozzie406 that there is no problem mentioning names of athletes who are involved with this kind of activity because if not found guilty then the ones reporting will be put to shame.
Brett Larner said…
Interesting to note four years later that every athlete mentioned in the note subsequently was suspended for doping/bio passport issues except Petrova.

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