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Kawauchi Taken to Hospital After Suffering Heat Stroke Near End of 50 km Ultra

http://www.fnn-news.com/news/headlines/articles/CONN00201759.html

translated and edited by Brett Larner

Click photo to enlarge.

2011 World Championships marathon team member Yuki Kawauchi (24, Saitama Pref.) was taken to the hospital after collapsing just before the finish of the Okinoshima 50 km ultramarathon in Shimane prefecture on June 19.

An amateur runner, Kawauchi earned his ticket to the Daegu World Championships by finishing 3rd at February's Tokyo Marathon in 2:08:37. He ran the Okinoshima race, located on the island where his late father was born, as a practice run for the World Championships. Running at a pace of 37 minutes per 10 km over the difficult, hilly course Kawauchi led the race the whole way, but in the last km he fell repeatedly before finally losing consciousness with 600 m to go. According to a spectator, Kawauchi was, "bent over, leaning forward. He was weaving back and forth and looked like he was out cold on his feet."

A race official said that Kawauchi was taken to a local hospital suffering from heat stroke and dehydration, but that he had regained consciousness and could speak. He was treated and was not expected to be kept in the hospital overnight. The race began at 11:30 a.m. with afternoon temperatures peaking at 25 degrees, 86% humidity, strong sunshine and light winds.

Comments

JY said…
Oh my God!
Did he push himself too much? or miss the water supply?
Hope Mr. Kawauchi get well soon! ><
Brett Larner said…
No updates today. Good news, I guess.
Sergio_CR said…
He always give everything he got. This can be good or bad for his health. Hope the "samurai runner" recovers soon.
Anonymous said…
Hope this nice guy will recover to run WCH! He's the best example of the sportsmanships!
Matt Holton said…
This guy is something else - Hope to see him in the lead pack at worlds.

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Lexicon

Betsudai - the Beppu-Oita Mainichi Marathon
daigaku - university
ekiden - a long-distance relay race
faito - a courseside audience cheer; see ganbatte
ganbatte (ganbare) - a courseside audience cheer; see faito
gasshuku - an intensive training camp
Hakone Ekiden - the annual university men`s championships
jitsugyodan - corporate-sponsored professional running teams
onsen - a hot spring
Q-chan - Naoko Takahashi, the 2000 Sydney Olympics women`s marathon gold medalist, Olympic record holder and first woman to break 2:20 in the marathon
rikujo - track and field, the marathon, and other running events
Rikuren - the JAAF
tasuki - the sash which is handed off during an ekiden
zannen - too bad
otaku - a nerdy, socially awkward person, usually male, who is obsessed with some esoteric topic

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