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Fukushima, Fukushi Lead Team of 17 to IAAF Continental Cup

http://www.sanspo.com/sports/news/100810/spg1008101851000-n1.htm

translated by Brett Larner

Rikuren announced on Aug. 10 that it is sending a team of 17 to compete in a new IAAF regional competition called the Continental Cup to be held Sept. 4-5 in Croatia. Athletes to be sent include national record holders Kayoko Fukushi (Team Wacoal), Chisato Fukushima (Hokkaido Hi-Tec AC), Minori Hayakari (Kyoto Koka AC), Yuriko Kobayashi (Team Toyota Jidoshoki) and Beijing Olympics 4x100 m relay bronze medalists Naoki Tsukahara and Shinji Takahira (both Team Fujitsu). The Continental Cup replaces the IAAF World Cup last held in 2006.

For a complete listing of the Japanese team click here.

Comments

Anonymous said…
Hi Brett,

Amby Burfoot suggested that I contact you, but I was unable to find a personal email address. I am currently a 4th year student at Oberlin College and I am putting together a project proposal for the Watson Fellowship in the fall. Due to your experience with distance running in Japan, he thought you might be able to provide some help and insight.

This is my proposal:
As an avid competitive female long distance runner and lover of travel, I will spend 4 months in 3 culturally distinct countries training with professional distance running teams. I seek to engage with the women members of these teams and document the stories of the different paths elite women distance runners of each country have taken to go from casual competitive running to professionalism, and how their paths have been influenced by their culture's understanding of athleticism and female gender roles. Training alongside these women will allow me delve into each community and explore the challenges these women face as they push both their physical and cultural limits and investigate what motivates them, while also furthering my own athletic goals.

After much consideration Japan, Norway, and Ethiopia are of highest interest. I currently have found a place that has welcomed me to train in Ethiopia, but have not yet found a training center in Norway or Japan. I have been in contact with a few professional teams in Japan, who have welcomed me to train with them, but there is a problem with the language barrier. I do not speak any Japanese. It has been suggested that it might be more manageable to train with a university team, where more students would speak English. Do you know of a center where I might be able to train with professional female women marathoners in Japan for a few months?

Thank you so much for your help and consideration!
Best regards,
Joanna
Brett Larner said…
Hi Joanna. Yes, I might be able to help. There is a contact email address in my user profile, located near the bottom of the blue field to the right.

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