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Asian Junior Championships Day Two Highlights


A new meet record in the boys’ 400 m courtesy of Sri Lanka’s Aruna Dharshana topped the results on Day Two of the Asian Junior Athletics Championships in Gifu. Dharshana’s mark of 45.79 led a Sri Lankan 1-2, with Japan’s Shuji Mori picking up the bronze in 47.09.

Japan earned a 1-2 of its own in the girls’ 1500 m, where Ririka Hironaka ran a PB 4:17.62 to win gold by 4 seconds over teammate Tomomi Musembi Takamatsu. Durga Pramod Deore of India was a distant 3rd for bronze.

Japan’s only other gold of the day came in the boys’ long jump, where Yugo Sakai jumped 7.61 m (-0.1 m/s) to beat China’s Keqi Zhou by just 7 cm. A missed opportunity came in the boys’ 10000 m, where Waseda University’s Yuhi Nakaya ran only 30:04.24 for silver, beaten by winner Cairen Suolang of China in a 30:01.51 PB run.

Japan also took silver in the boys’ 1500 m, Saife Saifeldin of Qatar getting the win in 3:49.30 to Reito Hanzawa’s 3:49.66 and Iraqi bronze medalist Hussein Haitham Lafta’s 3:49.75.

The Asian Junior Athletics Championships continue through Sunday. Watch the official live stream and previous days’ replays here.

18th Asian Junior Athletics Championships

Day Two Highlights
Gifu, 6/8/18
click here for complete results

Girls
Girls’ 100 m Final +0.7 m/s
1. Lulu Feng (China) – 11.68
2. Amasha De Silva (Sri Lanka) – 11.71 – PB
3. Mei Kodama (Japan) – 11.98

Girls’ 400 m Final
1. Jisna Mathew (India) – 53.26 – PB
2. Dilshi Kumarasinghe (Sri Lanka) – 54.03 – PB
3. Jui-Hsuan Yang (Taiwan) – 54.74
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5. Yuri Okumura (Japan) – 55.94

Girls’ 1500 m Final
1. Ririka Hironaka (Japan) – 4:17.62 – PB
2. Tomomi Musembi Takamatsu (Japan) – 4:21.65
3. Durga Pramod Deore (India) – 4:24.56

Girls’ High Jump Final
1. Maryam Abdulhameed Abdulelah (Iraq) – 1.80 m
2. Ching-Jung Tsai (Taiwan) – 1.78 m
3. Abhinaya Sudhakara Shetty (India) – 175 m – PB
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8. Nagisa Takahashi (Japan) – 1.65 m

Girls’ Javelin Throw Final
1. Hui-Jun Li (Taiwan) – 55.36 m
2. Sae Takemoto (Japan) – 54.16 m
3. Qianqian Dai (China) – 53.29 m
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4. Akiho Hyodo (Japan) - 51.10 m
6. Mahiro Osa (Japan) – 48.99 m

Boys
Boys’ 100 m Final +0.6 m/s
1. Lalu Muhammad Zohri (Indonesia) – 10.27
2. Daisuke Miyamoto (Japan) – 10.35
3. Muhammad Zulfiqar Ismail (Malaysia) – 10.46
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4. Satoru Fukushima (Japan) – 10.49

Boys’ 400 m Final
1. Aruna Dharshana (Sri Lanka) – 45.79 – MR
2. Pasindu Kodikara (Sri Lanka) – 46.96
3. Shuji Mori (Japan) – 47.08
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6. Shuhei Matsuo (Japan) – 47.58

Boys’ 1500 m Final
1. MKA Saife Saifeldin (Qatar) – 3:49.30
2. Reito Hanzawa (Japan) – 3:49.66
3. Hussein Haitham Lafta (Iraq) – 3:49.75

Boys’ 10000 m Final
1. Cairen Suolang (China) – 30:01.51 – PB
2. Yuhi Nakaya (Japan) – 30:04.24
3. Kartik Kumar (India) – 30:05.30 – PB
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4. Takuro Miura (Japan) – 30:55.80

Boys’ 10000 m Race Walk Final
1. Hao Gong (China) – 42:47.98
2. Sho Sakazaki (Japan) – 42:53.56
3. Mingyu Kim (South Korea) – 43:06.89

Boys’ Long Jump Final
1. Yugo Sakai (Japan) – 7.61 m -0.1 m/s
2. Keqi Zhou (China) – 7.54 m -0.4 m/s
3. Sreeshankar (India) – 7.47 m -0.4 m/s
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5. Taiga Oda (Japan) – 7.40 m -1.0 m/s

Boys’ Shot Put Final
1. Moaaz Mohamed Ibrahim (Qatar) – 18.57 m – PB
2. Jin Seong Yeo (South Korea) – 18.25 m
3. Ashish Bhalothia (India) – 18.22 m – PB
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5. Hayate Inafuku (Japan) – 18.10 m – PB
7. Kanta Matsuda (Japan) – 17.01 m

Boys’ Decathlon
1. Chen-Yu Wang (Taiwan) – 7200 – PB
2. Yu-Shiang Wang (Taiwan) – 6704 – PB
3. Rin Haraguchi (Japan) – 6693
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5. Tomoki Yamashita (Japan) – 6560

© 2018 Brett Larner, all rights reserved

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