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National University Track and Field Championships Day Two Results

by Brett Larner
videos by 陸上競技動画集
click here for day one report

An intense thunderstorm hit the second day of the 2014 Japanese National University Track and Field Championships, impacting events across the board increasingly heavily before causing the postponement of both the men's and women's 5000 m races until the next day.  Of the events that did go down, the performance of the day came in the women's hammer throw, where Hitomi Katsuyama (Tsukuba Univ.) threw 60.70 m for the win, missing the championships record by just 8 cm but beating her own best by over a meter.



Sprints led the day's other highlights, with 100 m London Olympian Ryota Yamagata (Keio Univ.) ran 10.20 into a -0.4 m/s headwind for the win in the absence of rival Yoshihide Kiryu (Toyo Univ.), who led the 200 m qualifying heats in 20.60 (-1.0) but expressed dissatisfaction with his ability to cope with the rising wind.



Yamagata also led Keio to a 5th-place finish in the men's 4x100 m, where Chuo University upset sub-39 qualifying round leader Waseda University with a big run from anchor Yu Onabuta to take the national title in 39.03 by a margin of just 0.07 seconds.



Anna Fujimori did double duty for Aoyama Gakuin University, leading the women's 100 m in 11.83 (-1.3) before returning less than two hours later to anchor Aoyama Gakuin to the 4x100 win in 45.63.



The National University Championships wrap up Sunday, with the early morning addition of the rescheduled men's and women's 5000 m making for a long and packed day.

2014 National University Track and Field Championships Day Two Results
Kumagaya, Saitama, 9/6/14
click here for complete results

Men's 100 m Final (-0.4)
1. Ryota Yamagata (Keio Univ.) - 10.20
2. Kento Terada (Chukyo Univ.) - 10.37
3. Takumi Kuki (Waseda Univ.) - 10.38
4. Yu Onabuta (Chuo Univ.) - 10.39
5. Tatsuya Yamaguchi (Josai Univ.) - 10.49
6. Yuki Takeshita (Waseda Univ.) - 10.50
7. Hayato Suda (Waseda Univ.) - 10.53
8. Kazuma Oseto (Hosei Univ.) - 10.55

Women's 100 m Final (-1.3)
1. Anna Fujimori (Aoyama Gakuin Univ.) - 11.83
2. Yuki Miyazawa (Toyama Univ.) - 11.85
3. Arisa Niwa (Chukyo Univ.) - 11.88
4. Sayako Matsumoto (Tsuru Bunka Univ.) - 11.94
5. Akira Koyama (Ritsumeikan Univ.) - 11.97
6. Kaori Oki (Aichi Kyoiku Univ.) - 11.97
7. Masumi Aoki (Int'l Pacific Univ.) - 12.08
8. Hiromi Shioya (Tsurugadai Univ.) - 12.11

Men's 4x100 m Final
1. Chuo Univ. - 39.03
2. Waseda Univ. - 39.10
3. Chukyo Univ. - 39.26
4. Josai Univ. - 39.60
5. Keio Univ. - 39.69
6. Hosei Univ. - 39.81
7. Daito Bunka Univ. - 40.04
8. Kwansei Gakuin Univ. - 40.19

Women's 4x100 m Final
1. Aoyama Gakuin Univ. - 45.63
2. International Pacific Univ. - 45.90
3. Sonoda Gakuen Joshi Univ. - 46.10
4. Fukuoka Univ. - 46.29
5. Tsukuba Univ. - 46.30
6. Osaka Seikei Univ. - 46.38
7. Tsuru Bunka Univ. - 46.57
DQ - Iwate Univ.

Women's High Jump
1. Emika Aoki (Chuo Univ.) - 1.73 m
2. Ai Tsuji (Konan Univ.) - 1.73 m
3. Kanako Hara (Kwansei Gakuin Univ.) - 1.73 m

Men's Long Jump
1. Kota Minemura (Tsukuba Univ.) - 7.90 m (+2.1)
2. Yasuhiro Moro (Juntendo Univ.) - 7.83 m (+2.0)
3. Mizuki Matsubara (Gifu Keizai Univ.) - 7.69 m (+2.2)

Women's Triple Jump
1. Kaede Miyasaka (Yokohama Kokuritsu Univ.) - 12.91 m
2. Risa Ichimura (Denki Tsushin Univ.) - 12.67 m
3. Chika Uchiumi (Tokai Univ.) - 12.46 m

Men's Hammer Throw
1. Yushiro Hosaka (Tsukuba Univ.) - 66.00 m
2. Kunihiro Sumi (Chukyo Univ.) - 64.57 m
3. Naoto Kurata (Kyushu Kyoritsu Univ.) - 62.86 m

Women's Hammer Throw
1. Hitomi Katsuyama (Tsukuba Univ.) - 60.70 m
2. Karin Motomura (Kyushu Kyoritsu Univ.) - 57.43 m
3. Shiroi Ikawa (Shikoku Univ.) - 57.11 m

Men's Decathlon
1. Kazuya Kawasaki (Juntendo Univ.) - 7449
2. Takayoshi Shinohara (Kwansei Gakuin Univ.) - 7397
3. Tsuyoshi Shimizu (Chukyo Univ.) - 7358

Women's Heptathlon
1. Megumi Matsubara (Tsukuba Univ.) - 5302
2. Akiko Ito (Tsukuba Univ.) - 5223
3. Eri Utsunomiya (Sonoda Gakuen Joshi Univ.) - 5216

(c) 2014 Brett Larner
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