Skip to main content

Chicago Marathon - Japanese Results

by Brett Larner
photos by Collin Winter and Dr. Helmut Winter

In the distance behind Kenyan winners Dennis Kimetto and Rita Jeptoo, Japanese runners Hiroaki Sano (Team Honda) and Yukiko Akaba (Team Hokuren) each took 7th at the 2013 Chicago Marathon, Sano running almost dead even half splits for a 2:10:29 PB and Akaba fading to 2:27:49 after starting out among the leaders.  Yoshinori Oda (Team Toyota) also sneaked into the men's top ten, dropping dropping American Matt Tegenkamp in the last 3 km to take 9th in 2:11:29.

Oda started out on 2:10-flat pace, with Sano and other 2:12~2:13 Japanese entrants Kenji Higashino (Team Asahi Kasei), Norihide Fujimori (Team Chugoku Denryoku), Hiroki Tanaka (Team Chugoku Denryoku) and Yoshiki Otsuka (Team Aichi Seiko) running in Tegenkamp's group with Alistair Cragg (Ireland) and Michael Shelley (Australia) at 2:11:30 pace.  As the pace gradually increased toward 2:10 first Oda was absorbed, then the group of Japanese men began to fall away.

After a 1:05:13 first half, 2:10:26 pace, only Sano, Oda and Higashino were left when the sextet hit 25 km on 2:10:16 pace.  By 30 km, on 2:10:00 pace, Higashino had been burned off with pacer Cragg soon to follow.  35 km saw the four remaining men back down to 2:10:16 pace, and over the final 5 km Sano showed the same strength he did in winning his marathon debut in February, pulling away to run down a string of casualties from the lead pack including pre-race favorite Moses Mosop (Kenya).

Akaba followed the opposite trajectory.  Starting out with the leaders on track to go just under 2:23 and looking under control, she began to fade between 20 km and the halfway point which she hit in 1:11:20, four seconds back from the top group.  From there it was a steady slide down in pace, falling as low as 10th but gutting it out to retake places and catching Ethiopian Abebech Afework in the final kilometer for 7th and just missing 6th-place Ethiopian Ehitu Kiros Reda.  Akaba's time of 2:27:49 came up far short of her goal of a sub-2:24, and after having changed her training approach this time to a Kawauchi-style method of doing races as training runs, for which she was curiously mocked by the American broadcasters, she'll no doubt be spending time evaluating what went wrong.

2013 Chicago Marathon
Chicago, IL, 10/13/13
click here for complete results

Men
1. Dennis Kimetto (Kenya) - 2:03:45 - CR, PB
2. Emannuel Mutai (Kenya) - 2:03:52 - PB
3. Sammy Kitwara (Kenya) - 2:05:16 - PB
4. Micah Kogo (Kenya) - 2:06:56 - PB
5. Dathan Ritzenhein (U.S.A.) - 2:09:45
6. Ayele Abshero (Ethiopia) - 2:10:10
7. Hiroaki Sano (Japan/Team Honda) - 2:10:29 - PB
8. Moses Mosop (Kenya) - 2:11:19
9. Yoshinori Oda (Japan/Team Toyota) - 2:11:29
10. Matt Tegenkamp (U.S.A.) - 2:12:28 - debut
-----
14. Kenji Higashino (Team Asahi Kasei) - 2:13:53
15. Norihide Fujimori (Team Chugoku Denryoku) - 2:13:55
18. Hiroki Tanaka (Team Chugoku Denryoku) - 2:15:36
20. Yoshiki Otsuka (Team Aichi Seiko) - 2:16:58

Women
1. Rita Jeptoo (Kenya) - 2:19:57 - PB
2. Jemima Sumgong Jelegat (Kenya) - 2:20:48 - PB
3. Maria Konovalova (Russia) - 2:22:46 - PB
4. Aliaksandra Duliba (Belarus) - 2:23:44 - debut
5. Atsede Baysa (Ethiopia) - 2:26:42
6. Ehitu Kiros Reda (Ethiopia) - 2:27:42
7. Yukiko Akaba (Japan/Team Hokuren) - 2:27:49
8. Abebech Afework (Ethiopia) - 2:28:38
9. Clara Santucci (U.S.A.) - 2:31:39
10. Melissa White (U.S.A.) - 2:32:37 - PB

text (c) 2013 Brett Larner
all rights reserved

photo (c) 2013 Collin Winter and Dr. Helmut Winter
all rights reserved

Comments

Most-Read This Week

Nikkan Sports Reports Olympic Ticket Lottery Success Rate of 2.95% Within Company

The Nikkan Sports newspaper company conducted a survey of its employees' success rate at scoring tickets to the 2020 Tokyo Olympics in the ticket lottery drawing following the announcement of the lottery's results on June 20. Including the opening and closing ceremonies, track and field, gymnastics, tennis, badminton, baseball, softball and medal sessions in other major sports, out of the 1288 sessions for which Nikkan employees applied they won tickets to a total of 38 sessions. The success rate among survey respondents was just 2.95%, an indication of how hard it was to get tickets to Japan's home soil Olympics.

Translator's note: Of the 28 sessions I applied for I won tickets to three, two in athletics and one in archery. Including only medal sessions, I got tickets to two of the 22 to which I applied, both in athletics. Interestingly, one of the ones I didn't get was stadium seating for the men's marathon finish, showing what a hot ticket that is going be.

A…

17-Year-Old Ryuji Miura Breaks 3000 m Steeplechase High School Record in World-Leading Time

At the Kinki Region High School Track and Field Championships Saturday in Osaka’s Nagai Stadium, 17-year-old Ryuji Miura of Rakunan H.S. took down one of the oldest records in Japanese athletics, breaking the 30-year-old 3000 m steeplechase high school record by 5 seconds to win in 8:39.49.

Running in heavy rain after clocking the fastest time in the qualifying rounds, Miura went straight to the front in the final and was on his own within 200 m. From the start the record was in reach as he went through 1000 m in 2:49 and 2000 m in 5:43, building up a lead of about 200 m over the rest of the field.

Miura’s final time of 8:39.49 was the fastest in the world this year by an U18 athlete and 6th-best among U20 men, a new Japanese U18 record and all-time #2 for the U20 category. He came short of the outright Japanese high school record of 8:19.21 held by future marathon great Daniel Njenga, but took 5 seconds off the Japanese citizen high school record of 8:44.77 set back in 1989 by futu…

National Track and Field Championships Preview - Jumps

Japan's National Track and Field Championships kick off this Thursday in Fukuoka. It's the start of an important cycle for Japan, with national representation at this fall's Doha World Championships on the line in the lead-up to next year's Tokyo Olympics. Anyone who has cleared the Doha standard in their event will make the team if they win at Nationals, with other qualifiers and hgh-ranked athletes having to wait until mid-September to learn their fates. Over the next four days JRN will break down the favorites in each event.

In the jumps, not a single athlete in any event on the women's side looks to have a realistic chance of making it to Doha without a big PB in the next couple of months. All four of last year's women's national champions, Haruka Nakano (Nippatsu) in the high jump, Juri Nanbu (Chukyo Univ.) in the pole vault, Ayaka Kora (Tsukuba Univ.) in the long jump and Eri Sakamoto (Nihon Shitsunai TC) in the triple jump, return. Of them only Kora…