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Tokyo Gets 2020 Olympic Bid Rolling On Yamanote Line

Boarding the Yamanote Line, the major commuter train line circling central Tokyo, just hours after the London Olympics closing ceremonies, we found the entire train decorated with Asics PR advertising Tokyo's bid for the 2020 Olympics featuring Asics-sponsored athletes.

The outside of the Yamanote Line. The rear door of each car also featured a picture of sprinter Chisato Fukushima in full stride.

Inside the train, with a track running down the center aisle.

The text at the bottom says, "Because it is hazardous, please do not run inside the train."

Marathoners Kentaro Nakamoto, Arata Fujiwara and Risa Shigetomo.

One of the many athlete features inside the train, this one spotlighting Fujiwara.

photos (c) 2012 Brett Larner
all rights reserved

Comments

Anonymous said…
...and you still want an apology from Risa Shigetomo? YOU *WILL* GET YOUR FUCKING APOLOGY ASSHOLE.
Brett Larner said…
Dear stalker,

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-DrWrJJRVibw/UCn17L1dfKI/AAAAAAAADJ4/39plG_vhpHg/s1600/mayeroff%2Bthreat%2B5.JPG

Threatening someone under your own name with your photo attached is generally not a good idea if you wish to avoid criminal prosecution. Deleting it from your Twitter feed is not going to undo it.

My apology comment was of course directed to you.
Anonymous said…
Whoever appeals to the law against his fellow man is either a fool or a coward.

Whoever cannot take care of HIMSELF without that law is both a fool and a coward.

Such is the rule of HONOR.
Brett Larner said…
Apologies to JRN readers for exposing you to the negativity and death threats of the above stalker over the last month or so. It is temporarily necessary to have them up but, like his previous rounds of threats against me, they will be deleted soon enough. Please bear with us.

Thank you.
Jason Mayeroff said…
Only a frightened little eunuch like Brett Larner would assume that the "settling of accounts" would be done in a violent fashion.

BTW, I will be in Tokyo August 27-30.
Brett Larner said…
To Jason Mayeroff:

Refrain from contacting me in any form, whether online or in person, at any point in the future. You will receive no response from me to any further communications.

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