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'Tokyo Runner One of the First Selected for ING NYC Marathon'

A NYRR press release for immediate release:

Keflezighi, Kastor Announce Return to 2010 ING New York City Marathon on Live Lottery Stream Show

Flurry of Activities Surround “I’m In. We’re In.” Marketing Platform to Help Launch Seven-Month Countdown to Race


A record 120,000 apply for November 7 race; Victoria Salbu of Oslo is first lottery runner announced

New York, April 7, 2010—Americans Meb Keflezighi, the ING New York City Marathon 2009 champion, and Deena Kastor, the nation’s finest female long distance runner of the past decade, were announced for this year’s ING New York City Marathon, along with the first runners selected from the lottery, by New York Road Runners president and CEO Mary Wittenberg on Wednesday, April 7, in the first-ever live streaming of the lottery selection.

The lottery show, seen at www.nyrr.org, was hosted by veteran sports announcer Bruce Beck and Wittenberg from the Parker Meridien Hotel overlooking Central Park. The announcement is accompanied by a flurry of activities in the opening strides in the seven-month countdown to the race on Sunday, November 7. A series of launch parties hosted by NYRR and open to runners, friends, family, and fans as part of the debut of the “I’m In. We’re In.” marketing platform will be held this evening. Three new multi-year marathon sponsors—Unilever, Nissan, and Tata Consultancy Services—were announced earlier in the week.

“With Meb’s win last year and Deena’s gutsy efforts over the years, they have become part of the magic and history of our marathon,” said Wittenberg. “We are so pleased to welcome them back today, as we warmly welcome runners from around the globe to our ING NYC Marathon 2010.”

Keflezighi, 34, returns after last year’s historic triumph, when he became the first American winner of the race in the 27 years since Alberto Salazar’s third win in 1982. Keflezighi’s victory, in a personal-best time of 2 hours, 9 minutes, and 15 seconds, was the pinnacle of an already illustrious marathon career that began with his debut in New York in 2002 and was highlighted by his silver medal at the 2004 Athens Olympic Marathon. Keflezighi will be one of the top contenders in this month’s Boston Marathon.

“The ING New York City Marathon has been the core race in my marathon career,” said Keflezighi, who will be making his fifth start in New York. “I came back several times looking for that elusive victory and I finally got it. I hope that my victory on November 1, 2009 teaches us that while we may not accomplish our dreams and goals overnight, we need to stay committed.”

Kastor, 37, made her marathon debut in New York in 2001 and will be making her fourth start in the five-borough challenge; her best finish has been her sixth place in 2006. The 2004 Olympic Marathon bronze medalist, Kastor has won World Marathon Majors titles in Chicago and London. She is one of the leading contenders in this month’s Virgin London Marathon.

“I was brought to tears when Meb won [last year] against a stellar field of the world’s best, and I’m inspired to commit to succeeding in New York come November,” said Kastor. “The ING New York City Marathon is a perfect representation of the diversity that the city is known for, and it’s wonderful to be part of such high-spirited celebration of running.”

More than 120,000 applications—the most in history—were received by New York Road Runners officials, who plan for a starting field of between 42,000 and 43,000. This is the fourth consecutive year in which 100,000 or more applications have been received for the five-borough race.

“A quantum leap in the number of marathon applicants, in the midst of the recession, speaks volumes about the importance of the ING NEW York City Marathon in the lives of so many,” said Wittenberg.

Reflecting the worldwide interest in the race, the list of the first entrants announced spans the globe—from Oslo, Norway, to Eugene, Oregon, and from São Paulo, Brazil, to Portland, Maine. The first lottery winners named were Victoria Salbu of Oslo, Norway; Rebecca Slater of Oxford, United Kingdom; Gustavo Bueno of São Paulo, Brazil; Seiichi Tanabe of Tokyo, Japan; Trae Richardson of Eugene, OR; Jordon Medeiros of Detroit, MI; Dr. William Burnett of Dallas, TX; Meredith Pendleton of Portland, ME; and Lynn Berman of New York City, NY.

New York Road Runners
New York Road Runners is dedicated to promoting the sport of distance running, enhancing health and fitness for all, and responding to community needs. Our road races and other fitness programs draw upwards of 300,000 runners annually, and together with our magazine and website support and promote professional and recreational running. A staff of more than 100, assisted by thousands of volunteers, stages the ING New York City Marathon, as well as a road race nearly every weekend plus many track and cross country events. NYRR’s home base in New York, and its lifelong identification with Central Park, have given many of its events iconic status, attracting the world’s top professional runners. Our youth programs provide running to 75,000 schoolchildren in New York City, around the country, and in South Africa who would otherwise have few or no fitness opportunities. For more information, visit http://www.nyrr.org/.

Comments

TokyoRacer said…
120,000. Gee, they're almost halfway to Tokyo's number.

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