What was the Japanese men's performance of the year?

What was the Japanese men's performance of the year?

Wednesday, February 17, 2010

Takaoka Nominated for JOC Overseas Training Study Position

http://www.sponichi.co.jp/sports/flash/KFullFlash20100215134.html

translated by Brett Larner

On Feb. 15 the Japan Olympic Committee announced that Rikuren has nominated men's marathon national record holder Toshinari Takaoka, 39, to a special position researching overseas training methods. Takaoka, who retired last March and is now a coach with Team Kanebo, must undergo a round of interviews with the JOC before being named to the position. According to a person involved in the proceedings, if Takaoka is accepted he will be sent to the United States to study American altitude training and coaching methods.

5 comments:

Brett Larner said...

Takaoka has the Japanese marathon record of 2:06:16 and ran under 2:08 on three other occasions. He also holds the 3000 m and 10000 m national records and at point held the 5000 m record. He attributed his success in the marathon to spending years working on his track speed before moving up, something largely missing in Japan. I think it is pretty likely he'll be looking largely at American success over 5000 m and, to a lesser degree, 10000 m.

Macario said...

Hello, The Japan Olympic Committee and Toshinari Takaoka, may want to consider Silver City, NM USA ( 6,000 ft alt., foothills of the Gila Ntl. Forest, and ideal training weather). I coach at the local university and I am in contact with the Dr. that is in charge of the exercise physiology lab at the university. We would be supportive if the research would be done in Silver City.

Simon said...

Brett, what do you think Takaoka could learn from US coaching methods? Would you say there is a general consensus / mood amongst Japan's distance coaches that new methods need to be incorporated to work their way out of the current malaise?

Brett Larner said...

Simon--
I think the interview with Takaoka that I put up today suggests answers to your questions.

Brett Larner said...

The agent who represented Takaoka in his professional career, Brendan Reilly, can also be reached here:

http://www.boulderwave.com/Site/Contact_Us.html

Many traditional Japanese arts are taught through observation of the master rather than direct instruction by the master. No need for anyone to spill their beans for Takaoka to learn from them.