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"Mr. 9.87" Kiryu Returns to Japan Saying "Next Time I'll Do It For Real"

http://www.sankei.com/sports/news/150330/spo1503300043-n1.html

translated by Brett Larner

Having run a wind-assisted 9.87 in the men's 100 m at the Texas Relays track meet in the United States, Yoshihide Kiryu (1st yr, Toyo Univ.) arrived back in Japan at Narita International Airport on Mar. 30, saying, "Next time I'll do it officially."  At the airport Kiryu was surrounded by throngs of reporters and other people on the scene, laughing as he said, "Things were pretty normal in the States, so I'm surprised to see so much buzz now that I'm back in Japan."

This season Kiryu has moved the position of his left and right feet in the starting blocks 10 cm further apart, leading to a smoother first step or two.  Of the race where he beat London Olympics 5th placer Ryan Bailey (U.S.A.) Kiryu said, "I'm feeling more familiar with what it's like overseas and picked up a little confidence that I'm not going to lose to foreign athletes."

Kiryu's coach Hiroyasu Tsuchie commented, "Running leaves an intense sensation.  Up to now he has only seen 9-second running on TV, so now that he has experienced it for himself the question is how much it is going to affect his consciousness.  This was a major step."  Thanks to a solid base of running over the winter, Kiryu said, "After the race I haven't had any pain anywhere at all."  His next race will be at the April 18 Oda Memorial Meet where he is entered in the 100 m and 200 m.

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